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New York State Environmental Board Approves Greenhouse Gas Standards for Vehicles

10 November 2005

New York becomes the second state to follow California in restricting emissions of greenhouse gases from vehicles.

The New York State Environmental Board approved State regulations, proposed earlier this year by Governor Pataki, that adopt the greenhouse gas emissions regulations passed earlier by California.

Vermont last week also adopted the California restrictions, under which new motor vehicles would be required to emit approximately 30% fewer GHGs by 2016 than without the regulation. (Earlier post.)

New York first adopted the California Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) program in the early 1990s, and has continued to follow the cleaner LEV program as it has evolved. Under the Clean Air Act, states have the right to adopt the more stringent California LEV program for its reduced automotive emissions, or they must adhere to Federal standards.

The approval of the regulations today is the latest in the series of changes necessary for New York to maintain adherence to the California LEV program.

The regulations will take effect for the 2009 model year. The New York Department of Environmental Conservation estimates that the regulations will reduce New York State’s light and medium-duty vehicle GHG emissions by an estimated 14,855,500 CO2 equivalent tons per year in 2020 and by 26,280,000 CO2 equivalent tons per year in 2030.

November 10, 2005 in Climate Change, Emissions, Fuel Efficiency, Policy | Permalink | Comments (7) | TrackBack (1)

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Comments

Well, well, well. It seems that everybody is going green. And I think that's pretty good. As global demand for eco-friendly cars soar, the top automakers are coming out with their own hybrid vehicles. It means only one thing Going Green, Going Good.

Does that mean they will be a "CARB" state or are they already? Any conjecture as to what this means for diesels? (By 2009, we should be using ultra low sulphur diesel fuel anyway). But the current CARB states ban the sales of new diesel cars.

The Bush Administration and auto companies are fighting CA and NY hard in court, hopefully the states win. This would be a big deal and would force the car companies to go fuel efficient.

And Republican Governors are at the forefront. It's funny how the federal administration and auto industry are trying to dictate to NY the quality of their atmosphere.

New York is one of the states that has adopted the California LEV standards, yes, and currently has restrictions on new diesel cars. ULSD rules come into effect next year, and the 2007 model year and later diesel cars, designed to work with ULSD, should be able to meet the requirements. DaimlerChrysler has said they'll be producing 50-state diesels by 2008.

With respect to the CO2 regs, diesels could end up being a significant component of an automaker's approach to meeting those requirements--as a diesel vehicle of equivalent output will produce much less co2 than its gasoline counterpart. (Less fuel burned.)

Recommend this article from Grist magazine.
http://grist.org/advice/ask/2005/11/02/diesel/index.html

It appears that Diesel fuel may not be as good on CO2 as most people assume. Apparently, it requires a lot more oil to produce a gallon of diesel than is required to produce a gallon of gasoline. It is recommended that one subtracts 20% from the fuel economy of a diesel to get gasoline equivalence.

Diesel also contains more carbon per gallon than gasoline, but with the better thermal efficiency they can still be maginally better on CO2. The real potential for diesels is of course biodiesel, but that requires a massive build up of infrastructure and oil crop farming.

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