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Honda Producing 2006 Version of Natural Gas Civic GX

6 December 2005

2006gx
2006 Civic GX

Quelling months of speculation on the Internet and elsewhere, Honda brought a compressed natural-gas GX version of its redesigned 2006 Civic to the Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA) Conference and Exposition, which opens today in Vancouver, Canada.

A GX model had not been part of the publicity surrounding the introduction of the redesigned Civic family. A Honda spokesman confirmed that the 2006 Honda GX displayed is indeed a production model.

The 2006 Civic GX is powered by a 1.8-liter, 115 hp (86 kW) engine fueled by a 8-gallon-gasoline-equivalent, 3,600 psi tank mounted in the trunk. The new engine is larger and slightly more powerful than its 1.7-liter predecessor, which delivered 100 hp (75 kW). (Earlier post.)

The only transmission available is a 5-speed automatic. Preliminary EPA fuel economy is 30 city/35 highway with a range of 200 miles.

As with its predecessor, the 2006 Civic GX looks to have about half the trunk space of a normal GX, and sports “NGV” graphics on each rear passenger door. The Civic GX is being assembled in East Liberty, Ohio, and is CARB certified as a AT-PZEV vehicle.

—Jack Rosebro

December 6, 2005 in Natural Gas | Permalink | Comments (10) | TrackBack (0)

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Comments

I wouldn't buy one of these. Doubt they will sell many.

But why? If natural gas is available why not?

North American natural gas production is peaking, there may not be much of an opportunity to save on the fuel bill, although with the home refueling station convenience is as good as electric vehicles.

Main reason to buy a NG car is the low emissions, but now that the Civic hybrid is AT-PZEV (old one was ULEV), it's harder to justify.

"Main reason to buy a NG car is the low emissions, but now that the Civic hybrid is AT-PZEV (old one was ULEV), it's harder to justify."
What are you talking about? You think a partial zero emissions vehicle pollutes more than ultra low emissions? Not only is the NGV civic the cleanest internal combustion vehicle for sale today, its also cheaper to run per mile than gasoline or diesel fuel. You never have to go to the gas station and if you live in California you get more tax deductions than a hybrid.

Justin I think you read Mikhail's post wrong, I did too at first. He's saying that since the new Civic Hybrid is a AT-PZEV (the previous civic hybrid was dirtier and "only" an ULEV), the difference in emissions isn't as great. It is pretty amazing how clean the Civic GX's emissions are, but with NG prices going up and (for the time being) gasoline prices coming down, it makes it harder to justify.

The Civic GX is rated at 30/35mpg, the Civic Hybrid is rated at 49/51. Theres a CNG pump 2 miles from my home (only CNG pump in the area really) that was priced at $1.49/GGE for what seemed like atleast 2 years but recently jumped up to $1.89/GGE. Gasoline price in KC is around $2.05 right now. If you got 35mpg in the GX at $1.89/GGE and 51mpg in the hybrid, the price of gasoline would have to cost $2.75/gallon to make the fuel cost similar. Now maybe gasoline will go back up that high next May, maybe the CNG price will come down in March, who knows. Prices for gasoline and CNG vary through out the country too. I was researching CNG vehicles awhile back and heard about some pretty low CNG prices in Oklahoma and rather high prices in L.A.

The only thing I don't like about the Civic GX is the small tank size, only 8 GGE. Honda says it has a real world range of 200 miles. 8 GGE 8 30 "mpg" = 240, so maybe you could push 250 in all highway driving but if you ran out of "gas" you'd be screwed. With the CNG infrastructure around the Kansas City area that limits you to about 100 miles radius around KC. Trips to Topeka (60 miles away) are in since they have a CNG station but Wichita (200ish miles away) are out, as is anything further.

Honda doesn't have the price of the '06 GX up on their website yet but the '05 had a MSRP of $21,760...the '06 hybrid's MSRP is $22,850.

"Honda doesn't have the price of the '06 GX up on their website yet but the '05 had a MSRP of $21,760...the '06 hybrid's MSRP is $22,850."

Honda's representative didn't give me any figures, but said that the price would be very close to the cost of the Civic hybrid.

The only reason natural gas is in this position for the car market is economics. The actual l/100 consumtion is greater. So, like the liquified coal to ethanol and biodiesel buzz, it is a patchup of a larger problem.
The only good that came of all this fuel scare is the market opening up for other fuel choices, which I guess is good in general for the expanding modern population who will all drive.
Since people are now using all their cards, the next fuel scare will leave us far less options resulting in a genuine panick.

I have a 2005 Civic GX and I love it. I installed the Phill device as well, so fuel costs me about $1.10/gge at home. California has an extensive CNG infrastructure, so it hasn't limited me in where I'm able to go.

some of these guys do have a point. you cant really honestly take this car on a trip. 200 miles at min, on top of that no natural gas stations in most areas. i can see the point on using straight gas civic or hybrid for being able to travel. sure the civic might be great say in california where they do have stations. If you really dont want to pollute as bad just going to work or cruising around anywhere in your local area with the pump inside your house like they sell. otherwise this car would be pointless to even travel with. i guess thats just my opinion, since i live in south dakota natural gas is always available at home, but not many stations for miles and miles and miles. if you find one you'll be lucky you did, but you'd more than likely be out of fuel by then.

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