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GM Offering B20 Option on 6.6L Duramax

8 February 2007

GM is now offering a Special Equipment Option on the 6.6L Duramax for B20 biodiesel capability.

The Special Equipment Option is available to fleets on the GMC Savanna, Chevy Express Commercial Cutaway Van, Chevy Silverado Heavy Duty, and GM Sierra Heavy Duty One Ton. Production on the Special Equipment Option is limited to 200 vehicles per model line in 2007.

General Motors Alternative Fuels Marketing Manager Mike McGarry said that GM is working to expand B20 capability in 2008.

February 8, 2007 in Brief | Permalink | Comments (15) | TrackBack (0)

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WTF??? Could some Dieselhead explain this to me. I thought any diesel could burn up to 20% biodiesel without modifications.

You could burn straight waste vegetable oil in your diesel as well - after a bit of filterin g to get he chunks out. But if you have problems they are yours alone rather than covered by warranty. Ensuring that a new fuel additive will not foul filters or lines, degrade seals, or corrode surfaces is not trivial.

I think the announcement here indicates that GM will, with some system modifications, cover warranty issues from engines that burn B20. Otherwise they might refuse to cover issues that they judge are related to the use of an alternative fuel.

As usual, the larger a customer's buying power, the more they could expect their market muscle to get anything they want from the engine manufacturer.

Any diesel engine can burn B100 without modification, as I run in my Jeep Liberty CRD. I don't understand this either. What is different about this engine?

I can only imagine that GM has finally gotten around to testing higher blends of bio. This engine passed their testing, so they can officially endorse B20 and put their warranty behind it.

The vehicles mentioned are generally for commercial/fleet use (contractors, service, and delivery).

Old deisels could and can burn various mixtures of biodesiel, but the heavuily emission controlled new deisels cannot. That is to say, while still meeting their emission targets, or fouling theer emission sensors and equipment.

I think that the filtration of the blends is questionable...especially in cold ambients. There are not clear stds on quality of blends (separation with H2O for example). The OEM will try to keep vehicles runnign blends limited to fleets which use these fuels on a regular basis. Too many unknowns. I am sure that the filtration system on vehicle is the "special equipment modification" that GM refers to...I do not think that this is an emissons issue.

I don't understand the emissions statement, about the heavily controlled new diesels. Bio diesel burns cleaner with less emissions, I would think it would be easier for the system to meet those targets.

I have been running b20 in my 2007.5 duramax and everything has been fine so far, and i have been thinking about running a higher blend because i have access to b99. But if somebody know's of some issues i might have, let me know.

I HAVE O4 SERRIA 2500 WIHT DURAMAX AND I HAVE BEEN RUNNING B99 FORM MANITOBA BIODESOL AND LOVING IT .HAD NO PRBLEM YET AND GETTING AROUND 900KM A TANK .PLUSE THE EXTRA POWER YOU GET FROM IT .THE POWER DEFERANCE YOU GET FROM B20 TO B99 IS NIGHT AND DAY.I DID HAVE TO CHANGE THE FEUL FILTER BUTYOU SHOULD DO ANY WAY

I work at the WINNIPEG CANEO CLUB GOLF COURSE and we started running b20 in are turf equipment .Then member compliments saying they liked the smell and no runninng problems we switch to b80 .Doing that cut are feul cost by 60 percent.For instance are TORO 5200 fairway mowers would cut 18 holes give or take . But wiht b99 we are getting 30 to 34 holes . BUT they smell like BBQS.Alright wiht us wiht those savings.And no power loss only power gain .

I have a 2006 Duramax and would like to use B20. Has anyone had major problems using B20,. Are you using factory filters?

I just ran into this msg thread.

I think by GM announcing that, they will probably change out the fuel lines etc. Bio can deteriorate fuel lines, but thats typically in OLD diesels. Nothing recent.

I dont see what they could do to my 2005 Duramax to make it run Bio better!

The special equipment on the fleet version for the B20 adds tank and filter heaters for the Bio to be heated

I have an Chevy Express 05 , 3500 runing on gas an willing to convert to an diesel engine ,If anyone know some viable info how to do this ,

I wouldn't hesitate too much with older diesels, but considering the way the new emissions systems work involves capturing materials in the exhaust, I would think switching fuels might create an issue. Perhaps its an issue that would not be apparent for tens of thousands of miles, but either way I kind of like my warranty not being voided over something as simple as B20 Biodiesel.

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