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Renault Launches eco2 Appellation; New TCE 100 Engine an Example

7 May 2007

Photo_media_en_13984_bd_ren2007eco2
Renault’s eco2 logo.

Renault is introducing a new appellation—Renault eco2—for its most fuel-efficient and “ecological” products.

Renault eco2 vehicles meet three global standards: they are produced in an ISO-14001-certified plant, their CO2 emissions do not exceed 140 g/km (or are biofuel-compatible) and, in addition to being 95% reusable at the end of their life, at least 5% of the plastics they contain have been recycled.

The appellation will apply to vehicles such as those powered by the downsized 1.2-liter TCE {Turbo Control Efficiency) 100 hp engine offered in the Twingo, the E85 Mégane scheduled for June release, and the B30 biodiesel Trafic and Master. (Earlier post.)

The eco2 line will initially apply to Renault-brand vehicles only, although the company will later extend the appellation to other regions of the world.

Tce100
The TCE 100 engine. Click to enlarge.

The TCE engine. Renault announced the development of the TCE 100 engine in 2006. The 1.2-liter gasoline engine will be applied in A- and B-segment models, and is first appearing in the just-announced Twingo.

The engine consumes 5.9 liters/100km (40 mpg US) of fuel and has CO2 emissions of 140 g/km.

In addition to the new Twingo, Renault will apply the TCE 100 in both the  Modus and Clio.

Developed from the 1.2 16V 75hp block, the TCE 100 features a low-inertia turbo that ensures minimal lag thanks to its small diameter turbine and compressor. Its maximum power of 100 hp (75 kW) and peak torque of 145 Nm (107 lb-ft) are available at 5,500 rpm and 3,000 rpm respectively.

Tce100map
Click to enlarge.

The turbocharger includes an overpower feature which temporarily boosts power output in 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears at engine speeds of more than 4,500 rpm (5 hp extra power and 6 Nm extra torque).

Some 30 per cent of the TCE 100’s components are new compared with the 75hp block. The new engine also benefits from several evolutions, notably sodium-cooled valves for enhanced resistance to heat, oil jet-cooled pistons and optimized cylinder head cooling. The injectors, sparkplugs and coil are all specific to the TCE 100, while its sump is made from aluminium.

The four-into-one exhaust manifold has been carefully designed to optimize the flow of exhaust gases in order to maximize the delivery of energy to the turbine. A tumble-effect movement of the air inside the cylinders favours combustion speed for enhanced chamber-filling efficiency and improved stability when idling.

May 7, 2007 in Climate Change, Fuel Efficiency, Sustainability | Permalink | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

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Comments

This looks like a sensible engineering approach to improving fuel economy in the B segment (in Europe, mostly compact hatchbacks). 100hp is quite sufficient for a car that is used primarily for city and suburban driving, and the turbo ensures that 90% of rated torque is available from ~1600RPM, permitting early upshifts in normal operation.

The marketing is a bit over the top, and hidden in there is a crucial caveat: engines must achieve "140 g/km (or [be] biofuel-compatible)". Using FFV capability to greenwash poor (gravimetric) fuel economy is a ruse we've already seen under CAFE rules in the US. Biofuels only mitigate climate change if well-to-wheels CO2 emissions are actually better than those for the corresponding conventional fuel. Granted, that is a complex calculation involving many parameters outside a carmaker's control - all the more reason to specify a limit for tailpipe CO2 emissions based on biofuel blend fraction.

Furthermore, until and unless refineries are required to blend in a small but significant percentage of biofuel components into ALL on-road fuel of a given grade, the CO2 footprint of a vehicle should still be computed on the basis of the lowest-cost option for the consumer, because that is what he/she will actually be filling up on. In most cases, that will be conventional gfasoline or diesel.

"Biofuels only mitigate climate change if well-to-wheels CO2 emissions are actually better than those for the corresponding conventional fuel."

I thought one of the advantages to biofuels is the CO2 neutral nature of the plants taking in CO2 while growing.

If two vehicle emit the same CO2 per mile, but one was gasoline and the other E100, I would think that the later car would do more good.

What you need is an Euro standard for biofuels that specifies the CO2 offset for each way of creating and transporting fuel to the pumps.

This would be complex as different sources and refining approaches would yeild different levels for the same fuel.

Thus ethanol from sugar beet would be worse than ethanol from sugar cane (for instance).

But it looks like a necessary step if biofuels are to help in CO2 reduction (and not just subsidize farmers).

You would have to be careful to resist political interference as it would be ripe for it.

SJC.

Theoretically, the uptake of co2 by the plant is equal to the co2 output from burning it. However, you have to add to that all the energy required to actually get the biofuels from seed to crop to refinery to market. That is where the co2 emissions come in.

We also have to recognize the fact that the energy content of biofuels on a volume basis is less than gasoline and diesel.

Based on Renalt's criteria, the Cadillac Escalade would meet their eco2 criteria.

SJC.

Theoretically, the uptake of co2 by the plant is equal to the co2 output from burning it. However, you have to add to that all the energy required to actually get the biofuels from seed to crop to refinery to market. That is where the co2 emissions come in.

We also have to recognize the fact that the energy content of biofuels on a volume basis is less than gasoline and diesel.

Based on Renalt's criteria, the Cadillac Escalade would meet their eco2 criteria.

Nice effort that is indicative of things to come: smaller & smaller turbocharged alloy engines.

However, had they included direct injection in this application they could have achieved even higher efficiencies.

They may have left this out to keep costs down. After all, the Twingo is on the lower end of the market.

There are only a handful of small turbocharged direct injection all aluminum engines currently in our market today:
MINI's Cooper S 1.6
Saturn Sky Redline/Pontiac Solstice GXP 2.0
and Mazda's Mazdaspeed 2.3 turbos

My vote goes for MINI's Peugeot-BMW sourced engine and GM's 2.0 direct injection turbo.

Now if they would put them in more practical vehices and I would buy one.

I can tell you from personal experience that the MINI's engine is a very sweet piece of equipment.

how can i upgrade my 1.2 renault engine in proton savvy.
it's not enough power on the hill road area

This engine was Developped from the 1.2 16V 75hp block of D4F engine so it might fit savvy's engine mounting nicely. well..you want to try out that hardy?

this engine is not comparable to those on MINI's Cooper S 1.6, Saturn Sky Redline/Pontiac Solstice GXP 2.0,and Mazda's Mazdaspeed 2.3 turbos since its develop to get highest power from smaller capacity engine and try to optimum the fuel-efficient and “ecological”. That was very impressive already for me.

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