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Mitsubishi Motors to Make 2,000 i-MiEV EVs in 2009

27 August 2008

Mitsubishi Motors Corp. (MMC) will produce 2,000 i-MiEV electric vehicles in 2009, the year the model will be launched in Japan, President Osamu Masuko said Tuesday.

The Japanese automaker will raise its annual output to 4,000 units in 2010 and then accelerate mass production, Masuko told Japanese reporters in Tokyo. Most of the vehicles will be sold in Japan for some ¥3 million (US$27,530) each.

Mitsubishi will begin selling the electric vehicles at reduced prices in 2010.

Masuko added that the firm will launch i MiEV road tests in Europe in October. A total of 12 vehicles will be used for the tests.

August 27, 2008 in Brief | Permalink | Comments (14) | TrackBack (0)

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Comments

How 'bout sending some treehugging love to the folks at Mitsubishi.

btw could you..umm..reduce the price a little when you sell it over here.

I guess it is the battery costs.
It is a pity they are so expensive as they look pretty good.
They should try marketing a version with 50 or 60% of the battery and lower cost to see if anyone wants one.
Better still would be the ability to buy a 60% battery, and if you find you need more after a month or so, get the bigger battery as an upgrade.

If you drove little, or could charge in the office, you could probably get by with a 50 mile range.

The other thing they could do is to promote "get U home" charging stations where you get 10-30 minute power and a cup of coffee included - to ease people's worries.

As very few people will have these cars, you would only need 1 space / station (initially).

Or you could promote "power spaces" in car parks where there would be 1 or 2 charging spaces, much like disabled spaces. You could also put them near the entrance to promote E-cars (small battery e-cars).

Or, you could build a 3rd party emergency power pack, perhaps a tiny ICE and some petrol to generate enough power to get you home, or go a bit further.
Enough to drive at 40 - 50 mph for 30 miles, for instance.
Either a "range extender", or a "nerves smoother".

High price? It's about the same as the Aptera typ-1e; the typ-1h is a bit lower. 100-mile EVs are not going to be any cheaper than that any time soon.

Man those are small numbers (2k in 2009 and 4k in 2010), rather underwhelming...obviously they'll be using these numbers to test things and get the bugs worked out of the technology. Makes you wonder what "accelerate mass production" after 2010 means? 8k a year?

I was hoping we'd seem them here in the states. I'd buy one! Would work great for commuting and errands and replace one of my gas powered cars.

It will be very interesting to follow the first 16kW Li battery pack. Though it will only be in Japan. At least it's the first real BEV to market. With many more to come.

This is a great price compared to the $37,000 number that was being kicked around a few weeks ago.

Mitsubishi (with this iMiEV) and Subaru (with the R1e) have long been the likeliest to get affordable highway-capable electric cars into the showrooms.

I agree with the idea of fitting some of them with a 'half pack' of batteries, offering a lower ticket price to those for whom greater distance is not a requirement (I speak with lots of people for whom this would be ideal).

The future is electric - and it's getting closeer.

Perfect for Japan.
And I should think for city suburban commuters.
Imagine these will be quite a status talking point for some years.

i wonder what the maintenance services are required in the MIEV manual... if there is none uh oh... i feel sorry for the techs/dealership industry, because damn i work in that field!!!

Well for a 5k product for the next year or two the cost is looking very good , I think the mass produce numbers will be between 30 an 50 thousand cars a year and I can see the price comming down another 6 or 7 thousand, so we could be seeing these in a showroom for a sticker price of 20 to 22 thousand and all I can say is I will be signed up on a waiting list even at 27k.

@ philmcneal - Don't worry too much. The still need some maintenance. Breaks, wheel alignments, electrical systems, computer upgrades, tires, other things that will inadvertently be particular to BEVs - all will need qualified repairmen in due time.

Understandably cautious approach.

A very costly battery recall is a possibility. And more likely when a new technology is introduced, then after a couple of years and lots of feedback.
Other car makers (along with battery makers) may take similar approach (low volume start), so the vehicle electrification (and hybridization) may become much more gradual than what many would have expected.

Even at this price MMC may be losing money.

A modular, upgradeable battery would be convenient for a large number of people as they would need a BEV with just a 20-30 miles range.
Easy upgradeability may significantly increase resale value.

"At least it's the first real BEV to market. With many more to come."

YOu mean, starting now?
Because different models of different automakers came and died.
PSA - Peugeot and citroen - still holds the lead at 10.000 BEV sold so far. Way to go for MItsubishi,but not so far away any more...

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