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Nikkei: Sumitomo Electric hopes to show prototype superconducting motor to automakers next spring

The Nikkei reports that Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI) Ltd. hopes to have a prototype of a superconducting motor (earlier post) for electric buses ready by next spring to present to OEMs.

Sumitomo has been working on motor application for its superconducting wire for a number of years. In 2008, SEI unveiled an electric vehicle equipped with a prototype superconducting motor cooled by liquid nitrogen and built using SEI’s high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The Sumitomo motor developed around 30kW with 120 N·m torque.

In September, 2007, a Japanese research group coordinated by IHI Corporation and including SEI unveiled a 365 kW HTS motor cooled by liquid nitrogen and using SEI’s DI-BSCCO superconducting wire. SEI’s bismuth-based superconducting material is made of bismuth - strontium - calcium - copper - oxygen (Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O).

Superconductors have zero resistance to the flow of electricity, so a vehicle with such a motor could consume 20-30% less energy than a conventional electric car using copper wire, according to the company.

The Nikkei reported that SEI hopes to start mass-producing the motors by 2020 and envisions applications in not only buses, but also forklifts and small trucks.

Comments

HarveyD

This may become practical when super conduction is achieved at higher temperatures. Keeping conductors at very low temperatures could be too costly (initial + on-going cost) and could negate most of the efficiency savings.

Engineer-Poet

It's cooled by LN2, Harvey.  RTFA.

Davemart

EP:
GCC's very own Dr Pangloss has no need to read articles!
the words just come out as a kind of natural excrescence - no context or comprehension required!

HarveyD

@ E-P:

Liquid Nitrogen is not very cheap and cost about $800/lb. Secondly, it does not last forever. Normal evaporation can be rather fast, specially when heat has to be absorbed at a higher rate. The article does not deal with it?

RTFA & TROLLS (2 of your favorites) must be from your Army days?

@ Davemart:

Were you in the same Army Artillery Corp?

Stevet321

@HarveyD Haha. Seriously? $800/lb???? Wow, how can high schools affort to spend that fortune freezing bananas and roses for a common science demonstration? Maybe that explains our national debt?!?! Lol.

Actually Harvey, we shouldn't just throw out bogus numbers. It appears that LN2 costs about 6 cents per liter if bought in bulk. Harvey, Harvey.... And, you insult his army days? Small....

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_much_does_one_liter_of_liquid_nitrogen_cost

HarveyD

16 Oz can of liquid nitrogen sells for $800 on eBay?

EV motors are already 95% to 96% efficient and control units are approaching 98%. Not much more to be gain there.

A more interesting avenue is e-city buses versus e-cars. A BYD-12, 40-ft e-bus can carry 60 passengers between 10 and 20 times a day. That's about 300 to 600 times the passenger miles per day that the normal e-car driver will do.

Since a BYD-12 e-bus cost only about 7.5 Tesla S one could say that it is about (450/7.5) = 60 times more efficient. That being said, why not apply 60 x $10K or about $600K subsidy per BYD-12 e-city buses. Cities could procure those e-buses for about $100K NET.

That would clean up city cores and reduce pollution and fuel consumption more than a few hundred/thousand BEVs?

Engineer-Poet

Harvey, you nitwit, LN2 is so cheap that science geeks buy huge Dewar flasks of the stuff to make instant-frozen ice cream at parties.  (It's good ice cream, too.)  In farm country, you can subscribe to a service and have your Dewar topped off at your mailbox once a week; livestock farmers use the stuff to store bull sperm.

If you insist on making such outrageously wrong claims, can you make them somewhere other than GCC?  This isn't a moonbat site, please don't try to make it one.

Davemart

Except for AD, our licensed Moonbat! :-)

Herm

Leave our Harvey alone!..

is LNG an AGW gas?.. we really dont want to boil our planet.

Arne

The 'L' in LNG stands for 'liquid', so it is not a gas.

'LNG' usually stands for 'Liquid Natural Gas', or methane. Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas, about 25x stronger than CO2.

But since the subject was liquid nitrogen, I guess you mistyped and meant 'LN2'. The answer is: no. Nitrogen is not a greenhouse gas and is already 78% of our atmosphere. Furthermore, LN2 is produced by liquefying air. Any liquid nitrogen you buy was taken from the atmosphere. We should therefore all be buying liquid nitrogen, and return it to its natural habitat.

Free the nitrogen molecules!

HarveyD

Eclectic Preacher (E-P) really likes to abase people by calling them dunces and many other names. That may make him feel superior but it is more commonly found among older foot-soldiers. Wonder how many years or how close he was with that group to catch the addiction. The problem is that it may never go away completely.

The price given was for pure liquid nitrogen including the high quality tank because you cannot carry liquid nitrogen in a paper bag. Of course, bulk commercial liquid relatively pure Nitrogen and specially liquid AIR is many many times cheaper.

HarveyD

A more suitable definition for E-P may be Exuberant Pedant?

kelly

fyi - http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2012/10/nitrogen-cycle N2, 1/10 milk price, engine

dursun

isn't this like "putting the cart before the horse"

kelly

dursun, http://www.ricardo.com does some serious engineering and backs liquid air.

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