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Ford Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid sedan EPA-rated at 108 MPGe city, 92 MPGe highway and 100 MPGe combined; Ford projects best hybrid sales quarter ever

13FusionEnergi_04
2013 Fusion Energi. Click to enlarge.

The US Environmental Protection Agency has rated the new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid (earlier post) at up to 108 MPGe city, 92 MPGe highway and 100 MPGe combined (2.2, 2.6 and 2.4 l/100km-equivalent, respectively).

Fusion Energi is the Ford brand’s fifth electrified vehicle to launch in the past year—and its second plug-in hybrid after the C-MAX Energi. Ford expects the Fusion Energi to accelerate its record hybrid sales pace, including its highest monthly hybrid sales month ever in November. Ford projects 19,000-plus hybrid/electric vehicle sales in the fourth quarter of this year, making it the company’s best quarter for hybrids ever and besting its own previous hybrid vehicle sales record by more than 50%; Ford expects more than half of hybrid sales this year to come in this quarter.

With Fusion Energi and Fusion Hybrid, the Fusion lineup brings the widest range of powertrain options to the US midsize segment. Fusion also is available in gasoline-fueled versions with a choice between a pair of fuel-efficient EcoBoost engines and a normally aspirated four-cylinder engine.

Like its cousin, the C-MAX Energi PHEV, the Fusion PHEV offers:

  • SmartGauge with EcoGuide to provide in-vehicle customizable displays, including instantaneous fuel economy readings and coaching functions to help drivers understand and optimize their fuel efficiency.

  • SYNC with MyFord Touch to manage and control phone, available navigation, entertainment and climate functions. Plug-in hybrids and all-electric models have additional options for monitoring information like battery state of charge.

  • EV+ combining the built-in GPS of Ford SYNC with proprietary software algorithms developed by Ford engineers to learn frequent destinations. As a result, vehicles give drivers more drive time in electric-only mode.

C-MAX became the fastest-selling hybrid ever at launch after 8,030 units were sold in October and November, the first two months C-MAX was on the market. The pace beat Toyota Camry Hybrid’s 7,300 sales in its first two full months of availability in May and June 2006.

The response to C-MAX really shows the amount of pent-up demand from a specific market for C-segment hybrids. Fusion Energi has a different audience in the midsize sedan market, but delivers many of the characteristics and technologies that make C-MAX Energi so great, which is why we’re anticipating a similar positive response.

—C.J. O’Donnell, marketing manager, Ford Electrified Vehicles

Ford differentiates between the two PHEVs by noting that C-MAX is geared toward those most concerned with fuel economy, but designed so that owners aren’t forced to sacrifice comfort and convenience. Fusion is designed with the driver’s sense of style in mind, delivering a midsize sedan that offers functional design elements that enhance its sleek exterior and promote fuel economy.

Many of the technologies of Fusion Energi are shared across Ford’s electrified vehicle lineup and draw from the automaker’s portfolio of about 500 patents related specifically to hybrid technology:

  • MyFord Mobile: Enables access via smartphone or Web-based interface to perform key tasks, such as monitoring a vehicle’s state of charge and current range or locating charge stations and planning routes to find them.

  • Eco cruise: Saves vehicle energy by relaxing acceleration compared to standard cruise control.

  • EV mode button: Conveniently mounted on the console to the right of the shifter—allows a driver to switch vehicle operation between three modes: all-electric, normal hybrid operation and conserve battery power for later use.

  • Regenerative braking is capable of capturing and reusing more than 90% of the braking energy normally lost during the braking process.

  • Hybrid transmission, designed by Ford engineers in-house, is capable of operating at high speeds and in a smooth, fuel-efficient manner at the same time. (Earlier post.)

  • Advanced lithium-ion batteries covered by an eight-year/100,000-mile component limited warranty.

  • Charge port with LED light ring, conveniently located on the driver’s side and near the front of the car, it features a light ring that illuminates to indicate charge status.

Comments

HarveyD

At 100 mpge combined for a mid size car, it is a real achievement. Will it be attainable by the majority of drivers?

HarveyD

An excellent interim solution, at least for the next 10+ years or until affordable 500+ miles BEVs become available.

Bob Wallace

...until affordable 200 miles BEVs become available.

Engineer-Poet

The next step is for HEVs and PHEVs to become enough of the market that the body design is changed to put the battery in the floor pan, a la the Tesla Model S.

Joe

I liked the Cmax PhEV until I saw the huge bump in the trunk, where the battery is stored, an unsightly view.

Davemart

EP:
Bumps to hold the battery are pretty much an American company thing.
Those that are coming or on the road and don't include the Fit EV, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, the Renault Zoe, VW UpE, VW Golf plug in hybrid and anything else the VW group decide to do as all of their chassis have been redesigned to enable a variety of drive trains.

Jus7tme

(continued)


What better alternatives are there: Well, a diesel hybrid will get much better real MPG (energy and CO2) than any plugin or pure EV vehicle. This will remain the case until nuclear power replaces coal and natgas in the grid mix, and this will take several decades at a minimum. In the meanwhile, we are all better off (energy-wise and CO2-wise) driving efficient (>50mpg) hybrids rather than charging vehicles with electricity from the grid.

Jus7tme

What happened to my first post?

Jus7tme

MPGe is a fraudulent measure of vehicle efficiency. It assumes that electrical energy comes into existence by immaculate conception. Please do nut be lulled into a false sense of green accomplishment by these impressive-looking but completely meaningless MPGe numbers.

http://www.deathbycar.info/2012/03/mpge-scam/

In reality, a large fraction (>60%) of the US electric grid-mix is generated from fossile fuels (coal and natgas), and MPGe does not account for any of the CO2 emitted nor energy lost in generation (huge losses) and distribution (around 7%).

Coal-fired electricity has an energy efficiency of around 33%, which means that a car that is rated 100MPGe in reality only gets the equivalent of 33MPG in terms of energy and CO2 usage when run on coal-fired electricity. With average grid mix (not just coal-fired), a 100MPGe plugin car gets maybe 50MPG in real life. This is no better than a Prius.

Jus7tme

MPGe is a fraudulent measure of vehicle efficiency. It assumes that electrical energy comes into existence by immaculate conception. Please do nut be lulled into a false sense of green accomplishment by these impressive-looking but completely meaningless MPGe numbers.

In reality, a large fraction (>60%) of the US electric grid-mix is generated from fossile fuels (coal and natgas), and MPGe does not account for any of the CO2 emitted nor energy lost in generation (huge losses) and distribution (around 7%).

Coal-fired electricity has an energy efficiency of around 33%, which means that a car that is rated 100MPGe in reality only gets the equivalent of 33MPG in terms of energy and CO2 usage when run on coal-fired electricity. With average grid mix (not just coal-fired), a 100MPGe plugin car gets maybe 50MPG in real life. This is no better than a Prius.

SJC

"..assumes that electrical energy comes into existence by immaculate conception.."

It has been my contention for years that energy to create electricity needed to be accounted for, that point was refuted by the usual suspects.

UCS (ucsusa.org) published a study recently that showed 100 MPGe is actually more like 50 MPGe , when energy consumed to make the electricity is taken into consideration.

Some are concerned that natural gas to synthetic gasoline is 60% efficient, which is allegedly horrible, but 40% efficiency to create and transmit electrical energy is perfectly acceptable.

ToppaTom

Poetic justice for Ford for their early disdain for EVs.

GM forged ahead initially with the EV1, then fell by the wayside.

Toyota stayed the course with the Prius family.

Now the Ford C-MAX comes late to the game and becomes the fastest-selling hybrid ever at launch.

There is a time for everything, and a season for every purpose under heaven:

- a time to be green and a time to wait.

ToppaTom

Um, if
"..it assumes that electrical energy comes into existence by immaculate conception..
It has been my contention for years that energy to create electricity needed to be accounted for..."

then are EVs claimed to get millions of MPGe?

Do you mean you have an issue with the MPGe formula?

SJC

Never debate with fools nor idiots, it is really futile to debate with foolish idiots.

Engineer-Poet
Some are concerned that natural gas to synthetic gasoline is 60% efficient, which is allegedly horrible, but 40% efficiency to create and transmit electrical energy is perfectly acceptable.
Feeding GTL gasoline at 50% efficiency (which is about the best it appears you can do) to an ICEV achieving 30% efficiency nets 15%.  The ICEV could burn the NG directly at 30%, or a CCGT at 60% feeding the grid, charger, EV etc. at perhaps 70% bus-to-wheels would net 42%.

Building physical plant with a 50-year lifespan which throws away a minimum 2x improvement in efficiency in order to support assets with 10 years or less remaining useful life... insane.

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