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Saint Jean Carbon building a high performance lithium-ion battery with recycled/upcycled material

25 November 2016

Saint Jean Carbon Inc., a carbon science company engaged in the design and build of energy storage carbon materials, and a battery manufacturing partner will build a high-powered full-scale lithium-ion battery with recycled/upcycled material from an electric car power pack and upcycled anode material from Saint Jean Carbon.

Saint John said that this project—a first—is intended to provide results showing that the battery materials can be re-used over and over again, greatly reducing the demand for continued mining and helping the environment significantly. The project will take a three-stage approach:

  1. Using proprietary and patented systems for dismantling and separating the chemistry and hard materials.

  2. Design and re-engineering the surfacing of the raw materials.

  3. Construction of two identical cells, one with new material and one with upcycled materials. Both cells will be tested to more than 10,000 cycles; this will create the most realistic sampling test results.

In the future having the ability to take recycled materials, reengineer them and repurpose to build a high performance lithium-ion battery (HPL) would be a first and would greatly change the raw material chain in energy storage applications and how the raw material will affect the cost of electric vehicles.

The outcome—if successful—will be step one in a multi-design build project that would ideally see a test vehicle built using the batteries.

The focus to work together to create a fully functioning upcycled battery is really a great opportunity for all parties involved, and aligns perfectly with our overall strategy. We have always had concerns about the significant amount of raw materials needed for lithium-ion batteries, frankly; making the environmentally sound energy storage devices, not so environmentally friendly when you dispose of them. With our technology and the knowledge strength within our team, we feel strongly, very promising results may come from the project.

—Paul Ogilvie, CEO

Saint Jean is a publicly traded carbon science company, with specific interests in energy storage and green energy creation, with holdings in graphite mining and lithium claims in the province of Quebec in Canada.

November 25, 2016 in Batteries, Lifecycle analysis, Materials, Recycling, Sustainability | Permalink | Comments (3)

Comments

Forget batteries. I WANT a small cheap gasoline hybrid air car instead that do over 200 mpg. Nissan just recently lunched in japan a serial gas-electric hybrid that do 80 mpg, i said to do gas-air hybrid instead because the waste heat from the ice can be recycled in air pressure instead and that will do 200 mpg. Is it clear now. Everybody, do not buy any new cars till they release an over 200 mpg car. If they don't release it, they gonna go all and each one bankrupt. There can be a buying strike from consumers if most everybody agree, spread the word. It's time to change all these moron car producers for sake of air pollution and high fuel costs.

@gor:

North Americans are going the other way and are buying more and more 20-22 mpg heavy pick-ups and SUVs gas eaters.

With very few exceptions (about 1% (125 mpge) electrified vehicles) we are very far from 200 mpg ICEVs?

Recent high quality Toyota Prius PHEVs will do up to 133 mpge and will probably be fine tuned to 150 mpge by 2020 or so. It would be a good replacement for your 30-33 mpg K-car.

@gor Ah, yes! Gasoline, the fuel of the future! The one our children's children will wonder why we didn't burn more of it!

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