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New Audi A7 Sportback features mild-hybrid system as standard; V6s with 48V system

Audi has unveiled the new A7 Sportback four-door coupe. All engines used in the A7 Sportback come standard with a new mild hybrid system (MHEV) for greater comfort and efficiency. With the two V6 engines, this uses a 48-volt primary electrical system.

A belt alternator starter (BAS) works together with a lithium-ion battery and achieves a recuperation performance of up to 12 kW when braking. At speeds between 55 and 160 km/h (34.2 – 99.4 mph), the four-door coupe can coast in freewheeling mode with the engine deactivated and then restarted comfortably via the BAS.


The start-stop function has been significantly expanded and now activates at 22 km/h (13.7 mph). In combination with the standard front camera, the engine is restarted predictively while at a standstill as soon as vehicle ahead begins to move. In real-world driving, the MHEV technology reduces fuel consumption by up to 0.7 liters per 100 kilometers.

The new Audi A7 Sportback will initially launch with the 3.0 V6 TFSI. The V6 turbo produces 250 kW (340 hp) and 500 N·m (368.8 lb-ft). The four-door coupe sprints from 0 to 100 km/h in 5.3 seconds and has a top speed of 250 km/h (155.3 mph).

In the NEDC, the base version of the Audi A7 55 TFSI consumes 6.8 liters of fuel per 100 km (34.6 US mpg), corresponding to CO2 emissions of 154 grams (247.8 g/mi). The 3.0 TFSI is paired with a seven-speed S tronic. Its quattro drivetrain uses the efficient ultra technology (developed with Magna) that activates rear-wheel drive as needed.


Additional six- and four-cylinder engines, both gasoline and diesel, will follow shortly after the start of production.

Chassis. The optional dynamic-all-wheel steering, the new electronic chassis program (ECP)—the central controller for the chassis—and the updated air suspension make the A7 Sportback even more agile, nimble and comfortable.

Many aspects of the front and rear axles have been developed from scratch. The standard progressive steering, the generally sporty ratio of which becomes even more direct the further the steering wheel is turned, features a new concept for intensive road feedback. Mounted behind large wheels—up to 21 inches and 255/35—with improved rolling comfort are aluminum fixed-caliper brakes with discs up to 400 millimeters (15.7 in) in diameter. Customers can choose between four suspension setups: a conventional steel spring suspension, the sport suspension that lowers ride height by 10 millimeters (0.4 in), electronically controlled damping and the self-leveling adaptive air suspension.

The top chassis-related innovation is dynamic-all-wheel steering. It combines direct, sporty steering response with unshakable stability, resolving the conflict of aims between agility and comfort. The steering ratio varies as a function of speed between 9.5:1 and 16.5:1 by means of active steering interventions at the front and rear axle.

At the front axle, strain wave gearing is used to superimpose these in response to the driver’s steering input. At the rear axle, a spindle drive turns the wheels by as much as 5 degrees. At low speed, they steer counter to the front wheels to further increase the agility of the big coupe when parking or driving in urban traffic, for example. This reduces the turning circle at full lock by 1.1 meters (3.6 ft). At 60 km/h (37.3 mph) and above, the rear axle steers in the same direction to increase straight-line stability and facilitate lane changes.

The optional sport differential improves handing even further. It actively distributes drive torque between the rear wheels, complementing quattro all-wheel drive. Like dynamic-all-wheel steering, controlled damping and the adaptive air suspension, the sport differential is integrated into the control function of the electronic chassis platform (ECP). These systems are closely networked for maximum precision. The driver can use the Audi drive select system to activate different ride profiles featuring a more pronounced difference between comfort and sportiness than in the previous model.

The body features steel and aluminum composite construction with large components such as add-on parts made of aluminum.

Audi AI systems. With the AI button, the driver activates the Audi AI remote parking pilot and the Audi AI remote garage pilot, which will be made available at some point in 2018. They autonomously maneuver the A7 Sportback into and out of a parking space or garage. The driver can get out of the car before launching the function via the myAudi app on their smartphone. To monitor the maneuver, the driver presses and holds the Audi AI button the entire time.

The central driver assistance controller (zFAS) merges the data from a sophisticated set of sensors to continually compute an image of the surroundings. Depending on the equipment level, there can be as many as five radar sensors, five cameras, 12 ultrasonic sensors and a laser scanner.

Besides the Audi AI systems, the new A7 Sportback features a total of 39 driver assistance systems to make things easier for the driver. They are split up into three packages: the Audi AI parking package (gradual introduction beginning 2018); the City assist package with the new crossing assist; and the Tour assist package. The latter includes such things as the efficiency assistant, which facilitates a driving style conducive to reducing consumption, and the adaptive driving assistant (ADA), which supplements the adaptive cruise control (ACC) with helpful steering interventions to maintain the lane. All driver assistance systems feature improved control mechanisms.

The new Audi A7 Sportback rolls off the assembly line at the Neckarsulm site and will launch on the German market in late February 2018. The base price for the 55 TFSI quattro S tronic is €67,800 (US$80,300).



VW isn't ready for EVs so their hope is to slow down the transition as long as possible and continue to sell ICEVs. 48 volt batteries is just another complicating factor to bamboozle the unknowing. Hopefully Tesla will solve their production problems so potential buyers don't buy an ICEV...Every ICE Audi sold is one more obsolete dirty polluter on the roadways for another 10-20 years..


VW wants to make money. Tesla does not make any money.


Hope it's more like VW has to make money to satisfy their investors while Tesla get a by because they are in growth mode. Once Tesla makes a good profit, they too will need to continue making a profit just like VW.


BAS on a V6 is not all that impressive.

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