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Ames Lab develops process for 3D printing of catalysts

2 November 2017

The US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has developed a 3D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.

While 3D printing has found applications in many areas, its use as a way to control chemical reactions, or catalysis, is relatively new. Current production of 3D catalysts typically involves various methods of depositing the chemically active agents onto pre-printed structures.

The Ames Laboratory method combines the structure with the chemistry in only one step using inexpensive commercial 3D printers. The structures are designed in a computer and built directly by shining a laser through a bath of customized resins that polymerize and harden layer-by-layer. The final product that emerges has catalytic properties already intrinsic to the object.

The catalysts built with this method demonstrated success in several reactions common to organic chemistry. They are also adaptable with further post-processing, making possible multi-step reactions.

We can control the shape of the structure itself, what we call the macroscale features; and the design of the catalyst, the nanoscale features, at the same time. This opens up many possibilities to rapidly produce structures custom designed to perform a variety of chemical conversions.

—Igor Slowing, a scientist in heterogeneous catalysis at the US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory

Resources

  • J. Sebastián Manzano, Zachary B. Weinstein, Aaron D. Sadow, and Igor I. Slowing (2017) “Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures” ACS Catalysis 7, pp 7567–7577 doi: 10.1021/acscatal.7b02111

November 2, 2017 in Brief | Permalink | Comments (0)

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