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High Performance Computing

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32.5M hours of supercomputer time to aid GM, Ford engine projects with Oak Ridge Lab

August 06, 2014

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Simulation of injector. Graphic from GM, Edwards AMR 2014 presentation. Click to enlarge.

As part of its 2014 ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) awards of processor time (totaling more than 3 billion processor hours), the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science has awarded 15 million hours on Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Titan supercomputer to a project led by General Motors, and 17.5 million hours on Titan to a project led by ORNL with Ford and Convergent Science as co-investigators. Titan is current Nº2 on the Top 500 Supercomputer list, and offers 27.1 petaflop (PF) peak processing capacity, with about 300,000 compute cores.

The two projects are part of a larger multi-year DOE-funded project to develop and to apply innovative simulation strategies and tools to maximize benefits of predictive information from high performance computing (HPC) for internal combustion engines. The Principal Investigator on that DOE project is Dean Edwards of ORNL.

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GE using Large Eddy Simulation on Sandia’s Red Mesa to lay groundwork for quieter wind turbine blades with better power yield

August 15, 2013

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Transition of flow to turbulence on a wind-turbine airfoil; isosurfaces of vorticity from a Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Credit: GE Global Research. Click to enlarge.

GE Global Research, the technology development arm of the General Electric Company, recently completed a research project in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories that could significantly affect the design—and thus the noise and power output—of future wind turbine blades.

A 1 decibel quieter rotor design would result in a 2% increase in annual energy yield per turbine. With approximately 240 GW of new wind installations forecasted globally over the next five years, a 2% increase would create 5 GW of additional wind power capacity—enough to power every household in New York City, Boston, and Los Angeles, combined, GE Research noted.

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