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GM Introduces Redesigned Subcompact 2007 Aveo

Aveo2007
2007 Aveo

General Motors (GM) on Thursday launched a fully redesigned version of the Chevrolet Aveo sedan just 2.5 years after its debut. The new Aveo features an all-new exterior and roomy interior design, but fuel economy compared to the 2006 model is just incrementally better.

The 2007 Aveo sedan is longer, wider and taller than its predecessor. Contributing to Aveo sedan’s more aerodynamic design is the incorporation of the radio antenna into the rear glass. Extensive wind tunnel testing also helped reduce the coefficient of drag from 0.348 to 0.326, compared to the previous model.

The 2007 Aveo uses the same E-TEC II 1.6-liter four-cylinder DOHC/16-valve engine with variable-geometry intake as in the 2006 model, and offers 103 horsepower (77 kw) at 6,000 rpm and 107 lb-ft (145 Nm) of torque. The engine is enhanced by an electronic throttle control, added in the 2006 model year, and variable geometry induction system, which help maximize power across the rpm range. Electronic throttle control enhances driveability and fuel economy, while reducing emissions. The Aveo 2007 carries a ULEV II emissions rating.

The engine’s variable geometry induction system is designed with a longer runner length at slower speeds to increase low-end torque up to 10%. The system includes a bypass valve that is activated in high rpm or heavy throttle applications.

Comparative EPA Fuel Economy (mpg US)
Car City Highway
Automatic transmission
*GM estimate.
2007 Aveo* 26 34
2007 Yaris 34 39
2007 Fit 31 38
Manual transmission
2007 Aveo* 27 35
2007 Yaris 34 40
2007 Fit 33 38

A five-speed manual transmission is standard. The available Aisin four-speed automatic transmission features adaptive shift technology.

Estimated fuel economy rating for the new Aveo is 26 mpg city, 34 mpg highway for the four-speed automatic and 27 mpg city, 35 mpg highway for the five-speed manual. The 2006 Aveo carries an actual EPA rating of 24 mpg/34 mpg for the automatic and 26 mpg/35 mpg for the manual.

Those figures are lower than those of the Aveo’s new competition, the Toyota Yaris and the Honda Fit. (See chart at right.) Both the Yaris and Fit use 1.5-liter engines.

For calendar year 2006 through the end of July, Chevrolet sold 35,078 units of the older Aveo, a drop of 16.1% from the 41,795 units for the same period in 2005. By contrast, Toyota has sold 32,822 units of the new Yaris, which went on sale in March. Honda has sold 15,922 units of the Fit, which went on sale in April.

The Aveo, sourced from GM Daewoo, is a global car for GM. In 2005, 68,085 Aveos were sold in the United States, and the car will be offered in more than 120 countries under different nameplates.

Comments

Joseph Willemssen

After looking the info up myself, it seems the current model Jetta TDI soundly beats this car in every category except emissions and price.

Oh, OK. So please post the data so we can see how "soundly it beats" it. Again, I ask - this is GREEN Car Congress, so shouldn't we be concerned about emissions? And the cost of the vehicle? Seems like it's easier to sell and propagate technology at $10,000 compared to $25,000.

As supplies are a more immediate issue than emissions, my opinion is to side with the vehicle that uses less fuel, period.

Emissions aren't an immediate issue? How does that work? You don't breathe?

Actually, biodiesel is a much better fuel from almost every standpoint.

That has nothing to do with what I said. What I said is that the potential to use a fuel means nothing unless people actually use that fuel -- especially in large numbers. There's a ton of "flex fuel" E85 vehicles out there, but very little by way of E85 consumption. Same goes for diesel cars and biodiesel consumption.

A friend of mine is changing vehicles, and he considered getting a diesel so he could use biodiesel. And I fully supported that option, until I realized he'd have to drive a very long way to get fuel -- which sort of negates the entire point of it. The vast majority of time he'd be using conventional diesel. And this is in the middle of Los Angeles, not Small Town, USA.

Maybe its just me, Joseph, but you still seem a bit edgy about the whole diesel thing.

Wow, good for you. Funny how I've never seen you post here before this thread, nor seem to show up on a search of your name for this website.

Have a nice day.

Patrick

The comparison of a Geo Metro 1.0L versus a Prius and both achieving roughly the same gas mileage shows that there have been advancements. The difference in weight (1000lbs), safety, comfort (NVH), and emissions are a testament to what can be done. If scaled down to a modern Geo Metro package it could be impressive indeed!

Now if they could apply more expensive drivetrains & quality to a small car we could get decent gas mileage numbers...oh wait, then it would be a Fit or Yaris.

I too am waiting for the modern diesels which will meet the 2007 regs without requiring me to fill up with Urea or any other extra components.

Mark Vincent

Odd, I have posted here a few times, but you're right that a search shows nothing. But I fail to see what my posting history has to do with anything? Why attack me for not posting the info you told me to go find myself? Your "edgyness" comes through loud and clear with this latest post, at least that's how I read it. No matter, you can stop beating on me now, I've had enough of it.

You do realize that huge amounts of ethanol are being burned in many states...the ones that mandate 10% in the summer. Biodiesel is also about to be mandated in several states in 2-3 percent.

As for your friend, how can he have to drive what you deem to be "a very long way" to get it? LA has many places to buy it, and multitudes of home brewers who will sell it at a very reasonable price. He can have a 55 gallon drum with a simple hand pump in his garage or yard. Seems like a cop-out excuse to me. No, it factually is a cop-out, as I know for a fact that there are many places throughout the LA Basin and SoCal in general.

I'm sure you'll proceed to verbally abuse me now, but that will only serve to show others your true colors.

Good day.

Joseph Willemssen

Why attack me for not posting the info you told me to go find myself?

"Attack" you, Mark? I simply asked you to do a little legwork yourself. I restricted the comparison to two vehicles. If you want to being up some other vehicles, you're more than welcome to. But go ahead and provide the data so we can all see the facts instead of vague claims.

Your "edgyness" comes through loud and clear with this latest post, at least that's how I read it.

And I could really care less about that kind of crap insult, Mark. I don't know you from a hole in the wall, so that kind of insult, from someone I don't know, is very trollish and unwarranted. You're free to do it, of course, but I'll also point out that you don't have much of a posting history here, if at all, yet somehow you "know" me.

Of course an ad hominem attack on me personally has absolutely nothing to do with the topic. So, again, do what you like, but it speaks for itself.

As for your friend, how can he have to drive what you deem to be "a very long way" to get it?

It takes a long time to get places in LA. I guess you've never been there. He lives in the Hollywood area, and the two existing biodiesel fueling stations are both towards the water -- one to the north and the other to the south, if I remember correctly.

LA has many places to buy it, and multitudes of home brewers who will sell it at a very reasonable price. He can have a 55 gallon drum with a simple hand pump in his garage or yard. Seems like a cop-out excuse to me. No, it factually is a cop-out, as I know for a fact that there are many places throughout the LA Basin and SoCal in general.

A "cop out"? LOL. You don't know a thing about him, me, or anything really to make that kind of ridiculous assertion. I know where he lives, I know how he lives, and I know him. Given all that, it is very unlikely he would fuel with biodiesel on a regular basis at the present time.

I'm sure you'll proceed to verbally abuse me now

Uh, no, Mark, that's you who started in with the personal attacks for no reason. Please stop projecting.

but that will only serve to show others your true colors.

Well, I have a long posting history here, so I think everyone else who has been here for a long time (ie, not people like you) are able to assess for themselves the quality and merit of my posts.

Good day.

You too, Mark. Thanks so much for your valuable input.

Joseph Willemssen

Just FYI to everyone - Vin DIESEL's original name was... Mark Vincent.

My apologies for taking the thing seriously. Unfortunately small things like that find amusement in trolling good websites like this.

Mark Vincent

If I were him, what would that matter? I would be a man who grew up in Greenwich Village and made something of myself. I would also know a thing or two about LA. You are offensive and a bully. I suspect you are meek and inconsequential in real life.

I also am of the opinion that you made the story about your "friend" up. You are a liar.

Good day.

Keith

My girl friend and I both have Geo Metro's and regularly get over 40 mpg even in city driving. So imagine our disgust when we were told by a Chevy dealer told us that the Aveo was a Geo replacement.

Tim H.

"My girl friend and I both have Geo Metro's and regularly get over 40 mpg even in city driving. So imagine our disgust when we were told by a Chevy dealer told us that the Aveo was a Geo replacement."

Oh, the horrror!!!!!!!!!!!!

john galt

A number of people in urban areas that have a true interest in fueling with biodiesel can work together to form a biodiesel cooperative. I've participated in these in the Wash/DC area and the Denver/CO area. Forming the cooperative is not that difficult; it mainly requires someone with extra space in their backyard or garage to place a 1000 gal tank and make it accessible to the coop members. We were able to rent a completely self contained heated tank and even set up a point of sale swipe unit for credit cards with payments going to our merchant account on behalf of the coop. The coop in turn purchases bulk delivery of biodiesel. Our price per gallon was at least 30 cents a gallon less than retail at a filling station. If you have ten or more friends interested in biodiesel it is likely worthwhile. The emissions guilt is moderated as we used B50 which has greatly reduced emissions impact than standard biodiesel. On my near term wish list... I've written letters to Honda, Toyota, and VW wishing for a plug-in biodiesel hybrid electric vehicle that meets the updated US diesel emissions standards... 125 mpg anyone?

sam

Why does a car that has a relatively small displacement (non-boosted) engine and low curb weight get such mediocre gas mileage ???? A car of this weight with this size engine should get 30 mpg city minimum. There must be some tweaks that can be made to the fuel/ignition system to decrease fuel consumption under low load conditions and still meet all EPA regs. Toyota/Honda seem to be able to do it.

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