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“E85 Everywhere” Rallies for More E85 Stations in Minnesota

A public-private partnership—E85 Everywhere—held a rally at the Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul to promote increased investment in more Minnesota E85 service stations.

The partnership aims to increase the number of E85 outlets in Minnesota from the current 310 stations to 1,800 in the next several years. Absent the investment, Minnesota will lose its spot as the US leader in per capita use of biofuels, according to the American Lung Association of Minnesota, which leads a partnership called Minnesota E85 Team, an organizer of E85 Everywhere.

While past investment has given Minnesota the most extensive bio-fueling network in North America and sparked record sales of the fuel (18.2 million in 2006, 8.1 million in 2005 and 2.6 million gallons in 2004), private and government grants used to help offset service station equipment costs have been exhausted, and current proposals to replenish these funds fall short of the estimated $12 million needed to make “E85 Everywhere” a reality.

Groups participating in Friday’s rally include the Minnesota Corn Growers Association, services stations, car dealerships, the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition, ethanol producers, General Motors Corporation and several state and federal vehicle fleets-all strong supporters of E85 and the work of the Minnesota E85 Team.

Comments

Paul Richards

I protest the inclusion of ethanol as a green product. It may not be pumped from below the ground, but it accelerates the spread of agricultural land at the cost of the natural world which is not experiences the extinction of species at a rapid pace. It raises the cost of corn which starves people already starving to death all over the world. And it perpetuates the illusion that we can continue to spread our footprint on the earth without consequence, without increasing global warming and backing us into a corner we cannot get out of. And lastly it is as polluting as gasoline or worse. Ethanol is greenwashing. It is a false hope. It is the antithesis of green.

Mark R. W. Jr.

Ethanol/ethanol blends should not be written off. It is less polluting than gasoline.

Of course, you are right, Paul, in the respect that ethanol derived from food crops is unsuitable for agriculture and for people. This is all the more reason why cellulosic ethanol has to be developed and implemented. Also better engine technology will have to be incorporated to properly unlock ethanol's potential such as turbochargers and direct injection.

Max Reid

Whether u guys like it or not, Ethanol is the fastest spreading fuel and has the capability to challenge.

It spreads in the form of E10, E25 and E85. Currently Corn & Cane is used, pretty soon the corn stalks and agro waste will be used and that will reduce the land usage. Give some time.

Any fuel that comes from source other than Crude Oil is considered an alternative. High oil prices are big trouble for everyone.

Erick

Now Americans just need some cars (or trucks as the case may be) that don't just chug ethanol like it's going out of style instead of taking advantage of the super-high octane and increasing thermodynamic efficiency... There's no point using E85 if you end up having to consume way more, and therefore way more fossil fuel that went into the production of the E85.

Max Reid

http://blog.wired.com/cars/2007/04/hot_discovery_b.html

A progress in Cellulose Ethanol.

Regarding Erick's comments, it all depends on the fuel price, if gas prices touch $3.00 / gallon, and stay at that level for few months, automatically the SUV / Minivan / Pickup sales will fall.

Already they are falling.

NIRMALKUMAR WALA

WITH SO MANY COMPANIES CLAIMING SUCCESS OF CELLULOSIC ETHANOL CAN ANYBODY TELL WHETHER CEL ETHANOL IS ACTUALLY BEING PRODUCED AT PRESENT BY ANY COMPANY AND AT WHAT COST PER LITRE?

SJC

As far as I know, there are no large scale cellulose ethanol plants in production. The NY Times recently did a story telling about the efforts over the last 10 years in this area. They outlined how everyone is still working on getting the method that will make it into production.

DS

look at this list!!

the Minnesota Corn Growers Association, services stations, car dealerships, the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition, ethanol producers, General Motors Corporation

The only Green these aholes know is on a dollar bill.

wintermane

Ethanol grows simply because farmers make alot more for fuel then food and as then breed/mutate new corn this will only expand.

rhapsodyinglue

When it comes to Americans, I think it's obvious we could do with a little less cane sugar and high fructose syrup. Unfortunately, the overabundance of food and calories in the developed world doesn't translate into food for those in the poorest developing countries.

In fact, developed world (US and EU) subsidies for agriculture and the resulting LOW cost of food is often cited as a cause of poverty because agriculture is one of the main businesses of third world countries.

However, I fully agree that systems must be put in place with some level of sustainability requirments for new biofuels development.

Phil Degrave

To all those worrying about the "developing world" lack of food because of ethanol...get over it. Maybe its time the food producing countries of the world, USA, Canada, Europe, form a cartel like OPEC and stick to countries like Iran. Call it OFEC.
They can raise the price on corn, wheat, etc.. when it suits them, like the thugs at OPEC do. What is the middle east gonna do, eat sand?

tom

As long as there are no upper limits on our consumption of liquid fuels, we will exploit every last nook and cranny of those lands that are at all suitable for growing corn. Without upper limits of some sort, any so called efficiency gains which be quickly eaten up by increased consumption.

The problem with ethanol is that it appeals to the idea that there are no limits; that we can consume at will without any regard to miles traveled or miles per gallon. The primary market is those who drive big trucks and SUVs; this is where E85 is being implemented first. This is very appealing to the auto companies since that makes their CAFE credit from using ethanol even larger.

Being able to utilize even more of the corn plant in the production of ethanol means that even less of the soil will be covered when it is fallow, causing even more soil loss, nutrient loss and escape of carbon and nitrogen to the atmosphere. Ethanol is primarily the conversion of one group of fossil fuels into liquid fossil fuels.

The basic math still holds. We are using 25% of our corn crop to produce 3% of our liquid fuel supply for vehicles. It is quite obvious that we are going to have an unacceptable impact on our food supply very soon.

tom

As long as there are no upper limits on our consumption of liquid fuels, we will exploit every last nook and cranny of those lands that are at all suitable for growing corn. Without upper limits of some sort, any so called efficiency gains which be quickly eaten up by increased consumption.

The problem with ethanol is that it appeals to the idea that there are no limits; that we can consume at will without any regard to miles traveled or miles per gallon. The primary market is those who drive big trucks and SUVs; this is where E85 is being implemented first. This is very appealing to the auto companies since that makes their CAFE credit from using ethanol even larger.

Being able to utilize even more of the corn plant in the production of ethanol means that even less of the soil will be covered when it is fallow, causing even more soil loss, nutrient loss and escape of carbon and nitrogen to the atmosphere. Ethanol is primarily the conversion of one group of fossil fuels into liquid fossil fuels.

The basic math still holds. We are using 25% of our corn crop to produce 3% of our liquid fuel supply for vehicles. It is quite obvious that we are going to have an unacceptable impact on our food supply very soon.

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