PG&E and Tesla to Research Smart Recharging Vehicle-to-Grid Technology
Federal Court Rules Against Automakers in Greenhouse Gas Standards Case

Report: Mitsubishi Heavy, Shell and ExxonMobil To Develop Coal-to-Liquids Facilities

The Nikkei reports that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. will jointly develop coal liquefaction facilities with Royal Dutch Shell Plc and ExxonMobil Corp.

...Shell and Exxon Mobil each aim to introduce such facilities beginning in 2010, and have embarked on projects to develop large-scale commercial plants capable of processing around 100,000 barrels of oil each day. They both requested Mitsubishi Heavy’s participation.

Mitsubishi Heavy will be responsible for developing a special compressor. This core piece of machinery will compress the oxygen and hydrogen produced when coal is thermally broken down. The heavy machinery maker, which is the leading manufacturer of chemical plant compressors, will develop the world’s largest compressor for coal liquefaction.

In anticipation of both oil majors building coal liquefaction plants, Mitsubishi Heavy will spend some ¥10 billion (US$88 million) within the next two years to boost production capacity at its Hiroshima works, where chemical plant compressors are developed and assembled, according to the report.

Comments

Cervus

With the oil majors being locked out of most of the remaining oil reserves, I'm not at all surprised.

Exxon's participation is a bit of a surprise. Industry scuttlebutt is that they have much better access to reserves than most IOCs.

Max Reid

Yes, Exxon's reserve replacement ratio last year is 99 % since they lost the oil field in Venezuela.

All these days, they claimed that there is plenty of Oil to last for a century, now they are moving to Coal, so its crystal clear that Oil is running out.

They can follow bp, Shell to Renewables, but Exxon likes only dirty fuels and hence Coal.

Daniel

I'm surprised MHI is in. Their gasifier is air blown (limited ASU size), so they should have limited experience with compressors (especially O2). There are more qualified vendors out there with excellent experience with thoses gases and sizes.

The comments to this entry are closed.