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Toyota to Show New Lexus Dedicated Hybrid at Detroit Show

In addition to the debut of a new concept electric vehicle, Toyota will unveil the Lexus HS 250h dedicated hybrid at the 2009 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit.

The HS 250h sedan will become the fourth hybrid in the Lexus line-up. At NAIAS 2008 Toyota president Katsuaki Watanabe said that Toyota would premiere two all-new, dedicated hybrids, one for Toyota (the new Prius) and one for Lexus at the 2009 event. (Earlier post.)

Adjacent to the HS 250h on the stand at Detroit, Lexus will offer an interactive telematics display, highlighting new, in-vehicle technology found aboard the new hybrid.

Separately, Toyota announced that it will show a new work truck version of the 2010 Tundra full-size pickup truck at the 2009 San Diego Auto Show, also in January.

The Tundra Work Truck Package is aimed at commercial truck buyers, and will be available with a V-6 and two V-8 engines including the 381 hp 5.7-liter i-Force V8, with a towing capability of up to 10,800 pounds. Tundra models equipped with the no-frills Work Truck Package are expected to carry a discount that will range from $550 to $655 less than the truck’s standard MSRP, depending on the model.

Comments

Sherry

OPEC will continue to cut production until they achieve their desired 80-100 per barrel again. We are at their mercy. We really need to get on about the business of becoming energy independent. This past year and the record gas prices played a huge part in our economic meltdown and seriously damaged our economy and society.We keep planning to spend BILLIONS on bailouts and stimulus plans.Bail us out of our dependence on foreign oil. Make electric plug in car technology more affordable. I just read an amazing new book by Jeff Wilson called The Manhattan Project of 2009 Energy Independence Now. It cost the equivalent of 60 cents a gallon to drive an electric plug in car. The electric could be generated from wind or solar. Get with it! Utilize free sources such as wind and solar. In fact, if all gasoline cars, trucks, and suv’s instead had plug-in electric drive trains, the amount of electricity needed to replace gasoline is about equal to the estimated wind energy potential of the state of North Dakota. Stop throwing away money on things that don't work. Invest in America and it's energy independence. Create cheap clean energy, create millions of badly needed green collar jobs. Put America back to work. It is a win-win situation. We have to become more proactive citizens, educate ourselves and demand our elected officials move this country forward into the era of energy independence. We need to stop talking about becoming energy independent and do everything in our power to make it happen. We need to use some of those bailout billions to invest in America becoming Energy Independent!

ToppaTom

AHA.
Finally, an unassailable example of GM management ineptitude.
The licensing of their brainwashing technology to the Japanese automakers has come back to haunt them. They are loosing the lucrative truck market.
While throwing a homely, high dollar, green washing, money loosing, hybrid into the (dropping from 6% to 2.4%) hybrid market, Toyota cleverly moves deeper into the (never less than 15%) truck market.
These are WORK trucks (it says so) and are not from evil American big industry, so I expect Pelosi will quickly push to grant them universal HOV access.

HarveyD

Sherry:

I fully agree with you.

The time has arrived for USA to do something to effectively shake the country from imported Oil dependency.

This cannot be done as long as USA consumes about (25% of the world's fuel) or 20 million barrels of crude oil every day.

Since we will not stop travelling, a progressive transition to electrified vehicles (HEVs, PHEVs and BEVs) seems to be the most common sense solution.

Affordable PHEVs and BEVs will not be around unless some sort of malus-bonus system is applied. People will not shift to e-vehicles if they cost much more than ICE units.

Instead of giving multi billion $$$ handouts to produce more gas guzzlers, we should use $100+B to aggressively promote the production of affordable higher performance battery packs, HEVs, PHEVs and BEVs.

A progressive fuel tax could finance this program over a 15 to 20 year period. An additive but variable fuel tax of 2 to 5 cents per gal/month could supply all the funds required. A ceiling, equivalent to Europe's average level, could be used.

HarveyD

ToppaTom:

Would you support special roads or lanes built, maintained and paid by truck owners.

Such roads cost a lot more to build and maintain and should be paid by heavy vehicle owners with much higher yearly registration or users' fees. Something like 50 cents/lbs/year (average) should do it. The first 2000 lbs could be at a much lower rate.

None electric heavy vehicles should eventually be banned from city streets. Too much air and noise pollution.

Many will not like it but similar changes may be coming. We can't mix dinosaurs with cars forever.

ToppaTom

Nope. Special roads or lanes for big vehicles would be a lose - lose, regardless of who paid for them.
Few people actually need BIG vehicles and so we need to quit making them desirable.
If it were not for the economy, and the domestic auto industry, high ($2+/g and increasing) fuel taxes would clearly be part of the answer.
Even WITH our economic and auto crises, it probably is.
My disagreement is with those who think our present situation can be blamed on GM, the Big-3, big oil, American industry or free enterprise. This is intellectual laziness/dishonesty at it’s worst and is likely to lead to bad solutions.
For many years cheap oil, prosperity and wide open spaces made big cars the logical choice for most Americans.
As times changed and the future became clear (oil imports and costs were a obvious problem), we did nothing effective (like raise gas taxes) so blame the politicians, blame democracy, blame the public. But the only conspiracy is with those who dislike free enterprise and so try to blame free entrprise and big industry for our fixation on self indulgence.

Mannstein

Yes, raise taxes on the average American who just happens to be $8,900 in dept on his or her credit card. And while you're at it why not make the average American walk to work if he or she still has a job so the rest of us can all breath easier.

That makes about as much sense as putting wings on pigs to make them fly. Give me a break.

HarveyD

Mannstein:

You very know that current very low fossil fuel taxes are not what is killing the USA economy.

Huge long lasting uncontrolled and unchecked gluts and excesses, in too many areas, created the current immense financial bubble.

Enron was an early example followed by many thousand more. When one man can embezzle over $50B from banks and advised investors before being investigated, there is a major problem in the promised land.

Sooner or latter, somebody will have to pay for all the bailouts (up to 5+ $ trillions) by December 2009.

Why wouldn't people with excessive size vehicles be called upon to contribute via much high fuel taxes and registration fees? People using smaller more efficient vehicles could pay very little (or even negative) registration fees. That would be a way to put and end to (one type of) unjustified excesses, reduce crude oil imports and air pollution at the same time.

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