Halcrow Presents Conceptual Design for Storm Surge Barrier to Protect the New York Metro Area
Weizmann Institute Scientists Demonstrate Novel Approach for Splitting Water into Hydrogen and Oxygen

Chiyoda, Technip and Qatargas 2 Inaugurate World’s Largest LNG Trains

Chiyoda and Technip, in joint venture, joined Qatargas 2 in inaugurating the Qatargas 2 Project, in Ras Laffan, Qatar. Trains 4 and 5 are the world’s largest LNG (liquefied natural gas) trains, with a unit capacity of 7.8 million tons per year. The third-generation mega-train processing is based on Air Product’s proprietary APX process technology.

Apx
The APX process. Source: Air Products. Click to enlarge.

An LNG train is the unit that transforms natural gas into liquefied natural gas by cooling its temperature to -162°C. Second-generation LNG trains could produce 4.7 million tons per year.

Chiyoda and Technip were involved in all aspects of the engineering, procurement and construction of Trains 4 and 5 from front-end engineering to start-up. These are the first two of six LNG trains to be inaugurated within the framework of the three projects (“Qatargas 2”, “Qatargas 3 & 4” and “RasGas 3”) ongoing at the Ras Laffan Industrial City. 240 million man-hours have been expended to-date in the construction and commissioning of Trains 4 and 5.

Chiyoda Corporation, headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, provides services in the field of engineering, procurement and construction for gas processing, refineries and other hydrocarbon or other industrial plant projects, particularly for Gas Value Chain Projects, on a global basis including the Middle East, Russia and South East Asian, Africa and Oceania regions.

Technip is a world leader in the fields of project management, engineering and construction for the oil & gas industry, offering a comprehensive portfolio of innovative solutions and technologies.

Resources

Comments

SJC

I wish we could go with biomass to methane gasification, instead of LNG, which is expensive and potentially dangerous. In some instances it may make sense, but there are alternatives.

The comments to this entry are closed.