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Fuji Heavy Launches Subaru Plug-in STELLA EV in Japan; Targets 170 Units in FY 2009

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Components of the STELLA EV powertrain. Click to enlarge.

Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (FHI), the maker of Subaru automobiles, launched its Subaru Plug-in STELLA electric vehicle (EV). The model will be sold in Japan directly through FHI, with delivery starting from late July. Around 170 units of delivery in total will be planned in this fiscal year (by the end of March 2010). After-sales services will be provided through some Subaru dealerships designated by FHI.

The production version of the STELLA EV features a more powerful traction motor than used in the prototype introduced last year: 47 kW and 170 N·m (125 lb-ft), compared to 40 kW and 150 N·m (11l lb-ft). A 9 kWh, 346V Li-ion battery pack comprising 16 modules in series supports a range of 90 km (56 miles) when driven in the Japan 10-15 mode cycle.

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The Subaru Plug-in STELLA. Click to enlarge.

The EV can be re-charged up to 80% of its capacity in 15 minutes using the quick charging system (3-phase 200VAC, 50 kW); a full recharge takes 8 hours with 100VAC household power or 5 hours with 200VAC.

Fuji Heavy has been using Li-ion packs from Nissan-NEC joint venture AESC (Automotive Energy Supply Corporation), but is considering expanding its battery procurement sources to potentially include PEVE, the partnership between Toyota and Panasonic Corp. Toyota holds a 16.5% stake in Fuji Heavy. (Earlier post.)

The Subaru Plug-in STELLA was developed based on the Subaru STELLA mini car. It combines the EV system with the compact and light body, which offers an adequate and convenient means of transportation for daily commuting.

The manufacturer’s suggested retail price of the Subaru Plug-in STELLA is ¥4,725,000 (US$48,000), including consumption tax and without factoring in subsidies. It was approved by the “Next Generation Vehicle Promotion Center” as a vehicle whose users are offered a subsidy of ¥1,380,000 (US$14,000) at a maximum. Additional tax reduction will also be expected due to special measures conducted by Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.

Comments

SJC

56 miles...$48,000

Not a real value proposition. Best of luck selling lots of these.

dursun

Makes the GM Volt look sane.

Mannstein

Anyone buying one of these either doesn't know what to do whith his or her money or needs their head examined.

SJC

This is a do it 'cuz we can car. Like the Prius and RAV4 EV, they will find that people want utility and value. I guess they have to test the market to learn this.

Alessio

Ehm, guys, these sort of cars are pretty popular in Japan .. they have small people, small streets and few parking space. It's not everywhere like in USA

SJC

The Japanese have profited well by selling cars in the U.S. If they want to sell this car only in Japan, that is their choice. If they want to sell many of them, they would sell in the U.S. and given the configuration, I find that unlikely. The RAV4 EV was a better configuration to do that.

tunafin


Sceptics to electric powered cars are a dime a dozen. Its takes more courage to genuinely solve problems of the planets environment. Was there any opposition to ICE powered transport when they started to develop knowing it would take billion dollar investments to develop mass industry to create the vast fuel reserves we have today? If you suggest that we hire the E.V. batteries that run these vehicles the idea is criticised for extending the expense of these cars. Do we pay for the structure of the fuel refinery when we buy a conventional car? No, it is all subsidised by multi-nation billion dollar corporations that can manipulate public opinion at the turn of a fuel cap. I ask then why are electric vehicles expected to
· generate their own power, only assisted by home electricity
· and compete with a institution of transport culture that has been enforced over nearly 100 years,
· are expected to be a similar drive away price to conventional cars
· keep up with their long developed creature comforts and luxury.
If history was reversed and the tables turned , place a model T up against a Toyota Prius 2060 model how do you think the old ‘OILER’ would do?

When car companies that introduce E.V.’s attempt to recoup their losses they are criticized, while environmental law in countries in like Japan are hugely restrictive and make a $48,000 Electric car a good long term buy. Septics are too quick to debase electric car technology when many of its facets are still in development; fuels cell and capacitor advancements, hydrogen cell development, and alternative fuel advancements. These environmental cars need a level playing field and not a boxing ring with both hands tied up

tunafin


Sceptics to electric powered cars are a dime a dozen. Its takes more courage to genuinely solve problems of the planets environment. Was there any opposition to ICE powered transport when they started to develop knowing it would take billion dollar investments to develop mass industry to create the vast fuel reserves we have today? If you suggest that we hire the E.V. batteries that run these vehicles the idea is criticised for extending the expense of these cars. Do we pay for the structure of the fuel refinery when we buy a conventional car? No, it is all subsidised by multi-nation billion dollar corporations that can manipulate public opinion at the turn of a fuel cap. I ask then why are electric vehicles expected to
· generate their own power, only assisted by home electricity
· and compete with a institution of transport culture that has been enforced over nearly 100 years,
· are expected to be a similar drive away price to conventional cars
· keep up with their long developed creature comforts and luxury.
If history was reversed and the tables turned , place a model T up against a Toyota Prius 2060 model how do you think the old ‘OILER’ would do?

When car companies that introduce E.V.’s attempt to recoup their losses they are criticized, while environmental law in countries in like Japan are hugely restrictive and make a $48,000 Electric car a good long term buy. Septics are too quick to debase electric car technology when many of its facets are still in development; fuels cell and capacitor advancements, hydrogen cell development, and alternative fuel advancements. These environmental cars need a level playing field and not a boxing ring with both hands tied up

SJC

It is not just recovering development costs, they can do that over a longer period of time. Lithium batteries in huge quantities are expensive. They either have to reduce costs in other areas or charge a higher price.

Fred H

Did I miss something? Have most car buyers suddenly started to make purely rational decisions?

Cool cars sell.

Of course cool means different things to different people. For some, zero emissions is way cool. For others, eligability for HOV lanes and reserved parking spaces, exempion from congestion charges, XX thousand Watt power supply for subwoofer, cruising super quiet through the neighborhood, using less middle east petroleum, being the first on the block, etc.

That said, I agree that it's still too expensive to be a big seller.

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