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14 Major Cities Form C40 Electric Vehicle Network

Fourteen major cities, members of the C40, announced the formation of the C40 Electric Vehicle Network at the Climate Summit for Mayors in Copenhagen. In collaboration with four vehicle manufacturers and the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI), these cities will focus on four key areas necessary for becoming electric vehicle ready.

Initial members of the C40 Electric Vehicle Network are: Bogota, Buenos Aires, Chicago, Copenhagen, Delhi, Hong Kong, Houston, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Toronto, Sao Paulo, Seoul and Sydney.

Through the C40 Electric Vehicle Network, the cities will:

  1. Facilitate the planning and deployment of charging infrastructure and related electricity supply systems in collaboration with local utilities.

  2. Work with relevant stakeholders to streamline permitting processes associated with charging equipment to encourage the safe and expeditious installation on customer premises and elsewhere.

  3. Coordinate monetary and non-monetary incentives available to the general public and organizations purchasing electric vehicles, and contribute to the package appropriately.

  4. Develop and publish a plan to mobilize demand for electric vehicles in city fleets for the period 2010 - 2013 and rally private fleets to the safe end.

The four vehicle manufacturers are BYD, Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC), Nissan and Renault. These companies will help inform cities’ on electric vehicle policies, vehicle procurement and infrastructure investment decisions through advice on vehicle specifications, charging parameters, business models for electricity supply, and incentives.

As part of C40 cities’ commitment to reduce GHG emissions and share best practise, the City of Hong Kong will host a workshop on Electric Vehicles in November 2010.

The C40 is a group of the world’s largest cities committed to tackling climate change and includes Addis Ababa, Athens, Bangkok, Beijing, Berlin, Bogota, Buenos Aires, Cairo, Caracas, Chicago, Delhi, Dhaka, Hanoi, Hong Kong, Houston, Istanbul, Jakarta, Johannesburg, Karachi, Lagos, Lima, London, Los Angeles, Madrid, Melbourne, Mexico City, Moscow, Mumbai, New York, Paris, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, Sao Paulo, Seoul, Shanghai, Sydney, Toronto, Tokyo, and Warsaw. The Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI) is the implementation partner.

Comments

sulleny

"These companies will help inform cities’ on electric vehicle policies, ...business models for electricity supply, and incentives."

Why would auto makers inform a city of business models for electricity supply??

Smells like yet another PR press release to attempt to show collective cooperation and alliance of community. And to plan another cushy junket on tax dollars.

HarveyD

One way to help people transportation in major cities would be with a few thousand small shared e-buses (10 passengers or so).

Each shared e-bus would be driven (free) by one or more co-owners.

Cities would supply the charging facilities at both ends.

Higher level of governments would pitch in with subsidies to help with the initial purchase cost.

Every 1000 of these smaller shared e-buses in a major city would:

1- remove 100+ large, dirty, noisy, diesel city buses from the streets

2- remove up to 10,000 private vehicles from city streets during peak hours.

3- do away with 100+ city bus drivers and as many support staff.

4- reduce diesel fuel consumption by 2+ million/gal/year.

5- reduce maintenance cost

6- reduce pollution and GHG

7- reduce absentism and late arrivals to work.

8- nine out of 10 people would arrive to work rested and be more productive.

9- reduce health care cost.

10- Etc

HarveyD

One way to help people transportation in major cities would be with a few thousand small shared e-buses (10 passengers or so).

Each shared e-bus would be driven (free) by one or more co-owners.

Cities would supply the charging facilities at both ends.

Higher level of governments would pitch in with subsidies to help with the initial purchase cost.

Every 1000 of these smaller shared e-buses in a major city would:

1- remove 100+ large, dirty, noisy, diesel city buses from the streets

2- remove up to 10,000 private vehicles from city streets during peak hours.

3- do away with 100+ city bus drivers and as many support staff.

4- reduce diesel fuel consumption by 2+ million/gal/year.

5- reduce maintenance cost

6- reduce pollution and GHG

7- reduce absentism and late arrivals to work.

8- nine out of 10 people would arrive to work rested and be more productive.

9- reduce health care cost.

10- Etc

SJC

We may see trucks and buses in the cities become natural gas hybrids. They have the room for the tanks and clean exhaust is appreciated by all. The lower fuel costs will improve profits, which is always a consideration in business.

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