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Honeywell Set to Turbocharge 70% of US Diesel Light Truck Segment With Launch of Ford 2011 Super Duty Truck

With Ford adopting Honeywell turbo technologies to boost its 2011 Super Duty Trucks, Honeywell says it will be turbocharging 70% of the US diesel light truck segment. General Motors uses Honeywell turbo technologies in its light duty diesel trucks as well.

Ford’s new 6.7-liter Power Stroke engine in its F-250 and F-350 models uses Honeywell’s VNT DualBoost turbocharger, a design that uses a double-sided compressor wheel mounted on a single shaft. (Earlier post.) The single-unit turbo delivers benefits approaching that of a twin-turbo system, but in a smaller, more efficient package.

In addition, this design allows a Variable Nozzle Turbine (VNT) DualBoost turbo to drive ultra-high levels of EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) in line with 2010 US emissions standards that call for 80% reduction in NOx while maintaining the ability to achieve higher horsepower.

In addition to DualBoost, Honeywell also offers AVNT, a variable nozzle technology that was first introduced for light truck diesel engines in 2001. Honeywell AVNT turbochargers were first equipped on General Motor’s Duramax engines in 2003, and since then have been continuously refined to adapt to several engine architectural changes.

The enhanced turbo aerodynamics and a new center housing design have resulted in a new generation of AVNT turbos that enable the latest Duramax engine to deliver 18% more power compared to the 2004 engine while meeting the latest emissions standards that called for sharp reduction in NOx emissions.

Comments

Henry Gibson

It is too bad that the NOX cannot be collected in a tank and deposited on the fields that grow food. NOX is a valuable fertilizer that could be collected from engines designed to produce a lot of it. Large engines that burn natural gas for the production of power should be operated in an enhanced NOX production mode that then uses equipment to capture the NOX. Ocean going ships should put the NOX produced into the water which will increase the production of organisms that capture CO2. First the NOX can be used to dissolve scrap iron or iron ore which will greatly increase the fertility of the ocean waters around the ship. ..HG..

Henry Gibson

APT and MITI have built electrically enhanced turbo superchargers that also could improve the performance and allow the use of more efficient smaller engines.

The computers of all new commercial vehicles should allow the easy addition of compressed natural gas substitution systems that replace the diesel consumption by 90 percent or more with natural gas or other liquified petroleum gases when and where available. There is much room and plenty of weight capacity on many commercial trucks, and standardizing such compressed gas sytems will make them far cheaper. In all cases the vehicle can still run on straight diesel when the natural gas tank is empty. Trucking companies can compress and even make their own natural gas (methane). If it were profitable, the energy used for compressing natural gas can be recovered with a simple turbine. Even more energy can be recovered if the natural gas is heated to engine exhaust temperatures before sending it to the expansion turbine. A few people know how to make this turbine operation very efficient. Such people have already considered and built equipment that recovers the cold energy from liquified natural gas when converting it to ordinary gas pressure and temperatures at the receiving ocean terminals. Liquid methane could be used in trucks in a similar way but with more efficiency available from the exhaust temperatures. ..HG..

Peter_XX


The NOx levels of future automotive diesels will be extremely low and also marine engines will follow this path, albeit with considerable time delay. It is not practical to collect NOx at such low concentrations. Note that the engine-out (i.e. before catalyst) NOx concentrations from moderns gasoline engines are an order of magnitude higher than from diesel engines. Although the concentrations are high in the gasoline case, I would not consider NOx capture as a practical solution after all. We know that, for example, NOx adsorber catalysts can capture NOx but I cannot foresee a practical solution based on this technolgy.

Peter_XX


The NOx levels of future automotive diesels will be extremely low and also marine engines will follow this path, albeit with considerable time delay. It is not practical to collect NOx at such low concentrations. Note that the engine-out (i.e. before catalyst) NOx concentrations from moderns gasoline engines are an order of magnitude higher than from diesel engines. Although the concentrations are high in the gasoline case, I would not consider NOx capture as a practical solution after all. We know that, for example, NOx adsorber catalysts can capture NOx but I cannot foresee a practical solution based on this technolgy.

SJC

Best way to get rid of NOX is to get rid of combustion and that means fuel cell hybrids. Create a DMFC and run on bio methanol, that would solve lot of problems.

fred

Sorry SJC. Diesel is a fact of life. The best way to get rid of NOx is to lower compression, ie combustion temperature, with higher cetane diesel/biodiesel. Here in Chicago weve got a bunch of diesel/hybrid buses doing their thing quite well, but I still see one needin a tow at least once a week. No new technology is going to surpass diesel reliability anytime soon. But hybrid tech/electric motors/batteries that could handle the "grunt" work of many apps would be great.

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