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Kia Motors Unveils Ray Plug-in Hybrid Concept at Chicago Auto Show

Ray
The Kia Ray plug-in hybrid. Click to enlarge.

Kia Motors America (KMA) unveiled the Ray Plug-in Hybrid concept compact sedan during a press conference at the 2010 Chicago Auto Show. Based on the Kia Forte platform, the Ray Concept is designed to be powered by an all-aluminum 153 hp (114 kW) Gasoline Direct Injected (GDI) 1.4-liter engine mated to a permanently-engaged fixed ratio Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT), used in combination with a 78 kW electric motor and a lithium-polymer battery pack.

Depending on driving conditions, power is sent to the wheels from the gasoline engine, the electric motor, or both together. The Ray concept is front-wheel drive with a four-wheel independent suspension.

As a plug-in hybrid, Ray is designed to reach driving distances of more than 50 miles using its electric motor on a single charge, and has a projected fuel economy rating of more than 202 mpg, and offers a total range of 746 miles.

The Ray concept is equipped with an engine-power saving alternator management system and a toggle gear-shift up/down indicator to encourage economical driving. Custom-designed low-rolling resistance with a hexagon pattern, narrow 20-inch (195/50R20) tires also improve Ray’s efficiency.

Designed with lightweight and recycled materials, as well as hexagonal roof-top solar cells embedded in the glass roof panel that power extra lighting or climate control systems, the Kia Ray is the fifth vehicle from the Irvine Calif.-based Kia Design Center America (KDCA) to be revealed in the last year. The latest design from KDCA follows award-winning Kia vehicles Soul, Forte, Forte Koup and the all-new 2011 Sorento CUV.

The Ray employs new “cool car” technology, including nano-laminate films and cool-glazing materials applied to the concept to dramatically reduce solar heat and demonstrate how keeping the interior cool will reduce air conditioning loads and greenhouse emissions. When the vehicle is parked in the sun, the roof-mounted solar cells provide a trickle charge that helps operate a cooling fan to reduce interior temperatures.

Ray also employs the all-new GreenEdge system by Infinity Audio, complete with loudspeakers that reduce power consumption and dissipation through lower self heating temperatures with increased acoustic performance, a better synergy between amplifier, speaker and vehicle. The amplifier used also reduces the idle power consumption by 50% of current Infinity speakers and employs a lower dissipation design for savings in overall weight.

With a focus to reduce overall weight through materials and design, the hexagon/honeycomb design shape can be found throughout the cabin, used as a repeated design element while tying the interior theme together. Used also in the door inserts and seats, this lightweight and breathable mesh serves to reduce overall curb weight as well as being a unique design element.

EcoDynamics. Kia uses the EcoDyanmics sub-brand to identify the most efficient Kia vehicles with significant fuel consumption and emission reductions. Recently, the EcoDynamics sub-brand took a major step forward with the introduction of the Kia Borrego Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) followed by the Forte LPI Hybrid, the gasoline Kia cee’d Hybrid and the twin-turbo diesel Kia Sorento Hybrid.

Comments

Freddy Torres

The winds of freemarket are blowing...HARD! I hope all our car companies are taking notice: Either you meet the new 2016 CAFE standards or someone else will! I really hope GM is not expecting the Volt to raise the fleet average all the way all by itself to 35.5 mpg because as long as they are selling 15 mpg SUVs they will have a hard time meeting the goal. I do have a major concern about how the 2016 fleet average will be calculated and this is why:
Let's assume the public buys 100 cars rated at 35.5 mpg from a car company. After driving 15,000 miles each, you would have burned around 1,500,000 miles driven/35.5 mpg = 42,254 gallons of fuel. Now look at what GM is most likely to do:
If the Volt is rated at 100 mpg, GM could sell 36 Volts for every 64 SUVs rated at 15 mpg and still meet the 2016 CAFE standard with 0.5 mpg to spare (36 cars * 100 mpg + 64 cars * 15 mpg)/100 cars = 36 mpg!. If you calculate the effective fleet mpg however, this is what you get: if all cars are driven 15,000 miles, 36 Volts (100 mpg) will consume 5,400 gallons while the 64 SUVs (15 mpg) will consume 64,000 gallons. Then the effective fleet mpg average is = (15,000 miles/car * 100 cars)/(64,000 gallons + 5,400 gallons) = 21.61 mpg!
This loophole could be the size of a barnyard. I hope the federal government clarifies the calculation so that we don't have to endure lawsuits from car companies because they won't be able to meet the 2016 CAFE standards when calculated the right way.

Freddy Torres

The winds of freemarket are blowing...HARD! I hope all our car companies are taking notice: Either you meet the new 2016 CAFE standards or someone else will! I really hope GM is not expecting the Volt to raise the fleet average all the way all by itself to 35.5 mpg because as long as they are selling 15 mpg SUVs they will have a hard time meeting the goal. I do have a major concern about how the 2016 fleet average will be calculated and this is why:
Let's assume the public buys 100 cars rated at 35.5 mpg from a car company. After driving 15,000 miles each, you would have burned around 1,500,000 miles driven/35.5 mpg = 42,254 gallons of fuel. Now look at what GM is most likely to do:
If the Volt is rated at 100 mpg, GM could sell 36 Volts for every 64 SUVs rated at 15 mpg and still meet the 2016 CAFE standard with 0.5 mpg to spare (36 cars * 100 mpg + 64 cars * 15 mpg)/100 cars = 36 mpg!. If you calculate the effective fleet mpg however, this is what you get: if all cars are driven 15,000 miles, 36 Volts (100 mpg) will consume 5,400 gallons while the 64 SUVs (15 mpg) will consume 64,000 gallons. Then the effective fleet mpg average is = (15,000 miles/car * 100 cars)/(64,000 gallons + 5,400 gallons) = 21.61 mpg!
This loophole could be the size of a barnyard. I hope the federal government clarifies the calculation so that we don't have to endure lawsuits from car companies because they won't be able to meet the 2016 CAFE standards when calculated the right way.

ToppaTom

The winds of the free market will, I hope be blowing hard soon
- this is a concept car.

creativforce

This is what the Volt should have been. What took car makers so long to come up with lightweight Herman Miller-style aero seats? (See the interior at Autoblog green.) If Kia can get this to market fast, they will leap frog ahead of every other car maker.

HarveyD

Freddy T

Yes, lobbies will be called to find and/or create loop holes in the 2016 CAFE, they always did.

They will find a way to exclude most gas guzzlers and the remaining few imported smaller cars will reach 40+/mpg by 2016. Qualified CAFE standards will be exceeded and everybody will be happy in the land of .....

wintermane2000

Um hello silly. The reason they still make low milage cars is because with the uaw high milage small cars simply arnt profitable. They need somewhere to get the money to then lose on the small cars OR they need to dump the uaw... guess what they are doing?

HarveyD

TT:

If one cannot compete in the world market building common sense high efficiency cars, it should be allowed to fold. That is the first law of free market.

It has already happened with many other products like radios, TVs, telephones, cell phones, computers, printers, cameras, buses, locomotives, rail cars, subway cars, ships, air planes, trucks, loaders, tractors, tools, hardware, plumbing equipment, cables, solar cells, e-motors, batteries, boats, lawn mowers, snow blowers, garden tools, cloths, shoes, boots, toys, books, games, audio systems, lamps, lights, glass, mirrors, furniture, wood flooring, ceramic tiles, paints, brushes, rollers, etc.

In the long run, can public money keep non-efficient manufacturing activities going?

How long can a large country prosper without an important manufacturing base?

USA (and many other manufacturing industrial countries) are faced with this dilemma. More of the same may not be suffisant to reverse the trend. Will the country find and follow the leader (s) with the appropriate solutions? A major long lasting recession may be required to make people realize and accept that major changes are required.

storky

"uaw high milage small cars simply arnt profitable."

Nonsense!

UAW workers can and will produce ANY design put on the production line.

Commitments to fuel efficiency begin in the boardroom before they are eventually directed to design, engineering, finance, tooling and eventually production.

sd

From creativforce

"This is what the Volt should have been."

This is a concept car and has doors that are not a reasonable real world solution. Also in my opinion, the Volt serial hybrid powertrain is a much better concept. The Kia concept car incorporates a CVT transmission. All CVT transmissions use friction which implies wear and efficiency loss. CVT transmissions are an outmoded concept. The dual clutch transmissions are more efficient. Yes, they have friction clutches but the clutches are only used during shifting and not continuously. The GM 2-mode hybrid transmission is also a much better concept than the outmoded CVT.

SJC

We may see PHEVs at the low end to keep the prices down. KIA, Suzuki and others make cheap cars that have room for all the cost of batteries, motor, controllers and other components. When you are trying to keep the end user price below $25,000, it pays to start with a $12,000 car as a base.

SJC

"uaw high milage small cars simply arnt profitable."

Germany has one of the strongest auto workers unions in the world and their car makers are doing fine.

Roger Pham

153 hp is way overkill. A 2-cylinder 700 cc engine at 75 hp is good enough, which will allow reduction in cost, weight and friction. This will allow the CVT to be reduced to 1/2 the size, resulting in saving in cost, weight and friction.

Parallel hybrid like this design allows elimination of the generator and allows the motor to be downsized from 105 kW of the Volt to 70 kW here, or even smaller, like 50 kW in the Prius. Power electronics is also downsized, with significant reduction in overall cost.

ToppaTom

It's a concept car.

And Ford, Chrysler and GM all had independent management but 4 things in common:
* The American market (with low gas prices)
* The ability to make BIG profits on big cars
* Inability to make money on small cars
* The UAW

Freddy Torres

Mr. Toppa Tom:

There is no such thing as low gas prices in the US. We the taxpayers have to spend half a trillion dollas per year to keep our forces in the Middle East in a futile attempt to secure oil resources. On top of that, we are paying an average of $2.70/gallon of liquid fuel for the 200 billion gallons of combined gas/diesel we burn in this country.

The only reason big cars are profitable is because we don't pay the true cost of fuel.

The only reason small cars are not profitable is because we don't want to pay for sustained incentives for fuel efficient cars.

The power of the UAW was greatly diminished once GM went into bankrupcy and Chrysler was sold to Fiat.

Excuses are running out...

Stan Peterson

Freddie

Your calculations are useless because you didn't read the CAFE` laws. outside of larger SUVs and trucks you would be hard pressed or find a single GM ca that doe snot meet CAFE right now.

Please disabuse yourself of the idea that CAFE measurements have anything to do with the arbitrary and constantly changed EPA window stickers, we are all familiar with. Unlike them CAFE has a standard unchanged since 1973 but with a single rewell documented recalculation, that allows cars of different eras to be measured.

DID you know or care that the Achieved CAFE for the domestic automakers was in model year 2009? The government actually calculates that figure and produces a sales weighted figure for each manufacturer.

The domestic automaker's cars actually achieved 33.47 mpg in the 2009 model year. Say it again, 33.47 mpg was what the domestic 2009 cars collectively obtained and achieved when measured by the CAFE laboratory measures.

Their truck ratings are obviously lower. On a cars only basis, they actually beat the imports by about a quarter of a mile per gallon. Terrible mileage from all those antiquated, gas guzzling, CAFE-fine paying, German Mercedes, BMWs, and Lexuses did the imports in.

You just didn't use the right ruler, and measuring stick.

It is entirely possible that no one will meet the truck rating beyond 28 mpg that was originally negotiated, when CAFE was raised. The Clueless One's cloacal cavities, know nothing, and figure if a Corolla can meet CAFE, why can't a Peterbilt or Kenworth Class 8 tractor do the same?

I know they TRIED to raise truck mileage to the same 35 mpg but I'm uncertain that ever became law, or just 'a goal', more verbal diarrhea to demagogue their juvenile, pseudo-intellectual followers, who carefully made sure they can't count either.

All had succeeded in graduating from college without ever taking any course that requires logic or counting beyond the rustle clink of coinage. Such is the carefully tailored coursework prescribed for Basket weavers, Finger painters, environmentalists, journalists, and tort lawyers.

Stan Peterson

Those people advocating a rise in oil prices, to guard against increases in oil prices make little sense.

It's like the fellow who warned me that I might burn myself cooking over a hot stove. Instead of waiting for it to occur, he recommended that I open my palm and press it hard into the red-hot burner so as to insure a good sear, right now.

B-O-L-O-G-N-A...

SJC

The large expense for GM is retiree health care that keeps doubling every 10 years. Instead of Medicare for these people it is self insured, in other countries they have national health care. I remember the word "competitiveness" coming up from time to time, this is it.

Ralph

Am I the only one who found this statement oxymoronic: "a permanently-engaged fixed ratio Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT)"?

I'm assuming what they meant was it's an "electronic CVT" similar to the Toyota Prius where the gasoline engine output shaft is fixed ratio, but electric motors provide additional torque as needed. Right?

ai_vin

@Stan
No one here is advocating a rise in oil prices. Freddy was talking about "fuel" prices; the gasoline and diesel you buy at the pump with the help of the America taxpayer who keeps the price low for you.

Gas should be bought and paid for at the pump by the driver, not paid for by non-drivers through the IRS.

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