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Early-stage renewable fuels and chemicals developer Dorsan joins ATI-Clean Energy Incubator

Dorsan Biofuels, Inc., an early-stage biotechnology company developing drop-in fuels and chemical products, has joined the Austin Technology Incubator (ATI), a not-for-profit unit of The University of Texas at Austin.

Dorsan uses proprietary technology to create fungal-based biocatalysts that can convert non-food biomass and waste streams into diesel fuel and a variety of food and fragrance products. By exploiting the native capabilities of fungi to produce hydrocarbon products, Dorsan says it has made rapid progress and is now working with several strategic partners to design a pilot plant. The company was also recently awarded a contract from the Army under the SBIR program to produce energy-dense fuels from microorganisms.

The Dorsan team, headed by CEO Kay Hammer, stands to shake up the hydrocarbon market with their technology. Scalable on-site production of drop-in fuels represents a huge step forward in the industry, and to have it commercialized through the Clean Energy Incubator marks not only a new direction for the CEI in the biofuel market, but a tremendous testimony to Austin as a comprehensive clean-tech hub.

—ATI-Clean Energy co-director Mitch Jacobson

The Austin Technology Incubator is a nonprofit unit of The University of Texas at Austin that harnesses business, government and academic resources to provide strategic counsel, operational guidance and infrastructure support to its member companies to help them transition from early stage ventures. Since its founding in 1989, ATI has worked with more than 200 companies, helping them raise close to $750 million in investor capital. ATI is a key program of the IC2 Institute at The University of Texas at Austin.

Comments

SJC

To me it is energy in to energy out. If it takes 300,000 BTUs of bio energy to make 114,000 BTU of synthetic gasoline energy, that is not a good return.

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