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Sn@C/graphene nanocomposite as Li-ion anode offers superior cycle performance and high rate capability

Researchers from South China University of Technology and the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics have fabricated a novel anode material for lithium-ion batteries consisting of tin nanoparticles coated with carbon embedded in graphene (Sn@C/graphene). The reversible specific capacity of the nanocomposite is 662 mAh g-1 at a specific current of 100 mA g-1 after 100 cycles, and 417 mAh g-1 at the high current of 1000 mA g-1.

These results, suggest Liang et al., indicate that Sn@C/graphene possesses superior cycle performance and high rate capability. The size of the Sn@C nanoparticles is about 50–200 nm.

The researchers ascribed the enhanced electrochemical performances to the characteristic structure of the nanocomposite with both graphene and carbon shells, which buffer the volume change of the metallic tin and prevent the detachment and agglomeration of pulverized tin.

Resources

  • Liang, Shuzhao et al. (2011) Superior cycle performance of Sn@C/graphene nanocomposite as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Journal of Solid State Chemistry. doi: 10.1016/j.jssc.2011.03.052

Comments

kelly

"The reversible specific capacity of the nanocomposite is 662 mAh g-1 at a specific current of 100 mA g-1 after 100 cycles, and 417 mAh g-1 at the high current of 1000 mA g-1"

Is this several fold improvement?

Mannstein

It would be nice to know what the state is after say 1500 cycles.

DaveD

Mannstein,

Don't forget, if the battery is that energy dense then it's easy to get a 300 or even 400 mile range. Then 300 cycles gives you about 100,000 miles for the warranty/expected life of the battery.

You wouldn't need 1,500 cycles unless you wanted the battery to outlive the car!

HarveyD

When coupled with improved other elements, what could be the battery energy density and power handling capacity?

DaveD

Anodes seem to always be ahead of cathodes in energy density and the anode only makes up maybe 20%-25% of the weight of the cell in a case like this...but that is a SERIOUS energy density.

I bet cost will be the limiting factor here. I can't imagine "tin nanoparticles coated with carbon embedded in graphene" is something sitting around in your average manufacturing facility right now so it is going to be a long time before something like this is affordable, forget the technical hurdles.

I'd LOVE to be wrong about that of course :-)

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