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New BMW 116d EfficientDynamics Edition will drop CO2 emissions to 99 g/km

1series
BMW 1 Series, Sport and Urban Line. Click to enlarge.

BMW is equipping its second-generation 1 Series with gasoline and diesel engines all of which feature new BMW TwinPower Turbo technology. The 1 Series will have a new generation of 1.6-liter gasoline engines: 116i with 100 kW/136 hp; and 118i with 125 kW/170 hp. Redesigned 2.0-liter diesel engines equip the 116d with 85 kW/116 hp, 118d with 105 kW/143 hp, and 120d with 135 kW/184 hp.

Also scheduled for launch later this year is the BMW 116d EfficientDynamics Edition, with additional fuel-saving technologies that will keep CO2 emissions over the EU testing cycle down to 99 g/km. BMW EfficientDynamics technology includes an optional eight-speed automatic transmission, and automatic Start/Stop function in both manual and automatic transmissions. ECO PRO mode is activated using the driving experience switch (included as standard).

Model versions for the new 1 Series include (EU test figures, variations due to differences in the tires fitted):

118i
Four-cylinder in-line gasoline engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo technology package, consisting of twin-scroll turbocharger, High Precision Injection, VALVETRONIC and Double-VANOS variable valve control. Capacity 1,598cc
Output 125 kW/170 hp @ 4,800 rpm
Max. torque 250 N·m/184 lb-ft @ 1,500–4,500 rpm
Acceleration 0-100 km/h 7.4 sec
Max speed 225 km/h (140 mph)
Combined fuel cons. 5.8–5.9 L/100km (40.6–39.9 mpg US)
Emissions 134–137 g CO2/km; EU5

 

116i
Four-cylinder in-line gasoline engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo technology package, consisting of twin-scroll turbocharger, High Precision Injection, VALVETRONIC and Double-VANOS variable valve control. Capacity 1,598cc
Output 100 kW/136 hp at 4,400 rpm
Max. torque 220 N·m/162 lb-ft @ 1,350–4,300 rpm
Acceleration 0-100 km/h 8.5 sec
Max speed 210 km/h (130 mph)
Combined fuel cons. 5.5–5.7 L/100km (42.8–41.3 mpg US)
Emissions 129–132 g CO2/km; EU5

 

120d
Four-cylinder in-line diesel engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo technology package, consisting of variable-geometry turbocharger, common-rail magnetic-valve direct injection (max. injection pressure: 1,800 bar). Capacity 1,955cc
Output 135 kW/184 hp at 4,000 rpm
Max. torque 380 N·m/280 lb-ft @ 1,750–2,750 rpm
Acceleration 0-100 km/h 7.2 sec
Max speed 228 km/h (142 mph)
Combined fuel cons. 4.5–4.6 L/100km (52.3–51.1 mpg US)
Emissions 119–122 g CO2/km; EU5

 

118d
Four-cylinder in-line diesel engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo technology package, consisting of variable-geometry turbocharger, common-rail, magnetic-valve direct injection (max. injection pressure: 1,600 bar). Capacity 1,955cc
Output 105 kW/143 hp at 4,000 rpm
Max. torque 320 N·m/236 lb-ft @ 1,750–2,500 rpm
Acceleration 0-100 km/h 8.9 sec
Max speed 212 km/h (132 mph)
Combined fuel cons. 4.4–4.5 L/100km (53.5–52.3 mpg US)
Emissions 115–118 g CO2/km; EU5

 

116d
Four-cylinder in-line diesel engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo technology package, consisting of variable-geometry turbocharger with common-rail, magnetic-valve direct injection (max. injection pressure: 1,600 bar). Capacity 1,955cc
Output 85 kW/116 hp at 4,000 rpm
Max. torque 260 N·m/192 lb-ft @ 1,750–2,500 rpm
Acceleration 0-100 km/h 10.3 sec
Max speed 200 km/h (124 mph)
Combined fuel cons. 4.3–4.5 L/100km (54.7–52.3 mpg US)
Emissions 114–117 g CO2/km; EU5

Comments

HarveyD

The 120d will have impressive muscle diesel car performances with excellent low fuel consumption and reasonable emissions.

The same could be said of the 118i gasoline version for those who prefer that technology.

Other manufacturers will have to fine tune their products to try to match or even do better. The race is not over.

SJC

The 118i has good output for the displacement. Now if they would get their styling in shape they might sell more.

3PeaceSweet

The rear wheel drive system could make it easy to add an electric motor to the front axle to create a hybrid

baldwincng

This is ruining it for coal fired EVs like the Leaf. What is the point of an EV ??

SJC

Putting aside the troll nature of that rhetorical "question", I would say that it is not a good idea to try to put a lump of coal in your gas tank.

HarveyD

Cubes are selling well....

SJC

If I make electricity at 40% efficiency in a coal plant, transmit, charge batteries, get it out of batteries and put it through a controller and motor, I am just about as well off making synthetic diesel, putting it in a plug hybrid and driving down the road.

Then I have fuel for the other 200 million vehicles, do not over load the grid and reduce oil imports enough to tell OPEC where to put their oil.

Thomas Pedersen

Slightly disappointing that the article has no mention of the ED-edition featured in the headline. The press release mentions that the 116d-ED will have the same 2.0 litre diesel with 116 hp.

The regular 116d has a not-so-impressive drag coefficient of 0.30 (compared to 0.26 for the 320d-ED), yet achieves a top speed of 200 km/h. I would expect the ED version to have 4-6 km/h higher top speed assuming improved aerodynamics.

For the Americans it is worth noting that the strong versions are more efficient with the 8-speed steptronic (fully automatic) because of high final gear ratio (42mph @ 1000rpm).

Peter_XX

Although impressive fuel consumption (116 EDE) for a 2-liter engine, it looks like “anti-downsizing” to me to use such a big engine to get 116 hp. This illustrates the drawback of using various power ratings for an engine of a specific size. The 1.5-liter 3-cylinder engine (@163 hp) under development would provide even lower fuel consumption than the 116 EDE. Obviously, this engine is not quite ready yet... It seems scheduled for the new 3-series. If we extrapolate a little, 1.1 liter would be sufficient to get 116 hp, although we will probably never see such a small engine in a BMW.

mahonj

You would hope to see this technology trickle down into mass market cars such as the Ford Focus, Peugeot 308,etc. where it could make a huge difference.
However, it is great to see the luxury car manufacturers competing on low fuel consumption as well as just performance.
Many BMWs (+Mercs etc) are so overpowered it is ridiculous - it is good to see them addressing more pressing problems, such as fuel consumption.

The question then becomes can mid and lower market cars benefit from the technology or does it remain in high end cars only.

Peter_XX

We have to respect that different manufacturers represent various niches on the market. As long as customers want power and big cars, someone will supply that. It would be “suicide” for BMW and Mercedes to supply cheap and simple cars and the same for Ford if they tried to market a luxury car (as they have tried in the past, from time to time with little success…). Still, it is good to see that premium car manufacturers try to reduce fuel consumption.

Yes, Mahonj, mid and lower market cars will benefit from this technology. A new version of the Ford Econetic will be introduced next year with similar technology as the BMW. The fuel consumption will be 3,7 l/100 km. I am considering buying one …

Dilyan Marinov

Still a long way to go considering the benchmark in the segment is 87 g/km.

Peter_XX

Dilyan
Long way??? No, it is actually extremely close; since I consider that you might refer to Toyota Prius and if you order anything but the lowest spec. (e.g. tiny tires), CO2 increases. Furthermore, I just saw that I used the figure for the old Focus in my previous comment. The new Focus Econetic has a fuel consumption of 3.5 l/100 km. The corresponding CO2 level is 94 g/km, i.e. very close to the Prius. The VW Polo 1.2 TDI has a fuel consumption of 3.3 I/100 km and corresponding CO2 level is 87 g/km. If you refer to this car as the benchmark, one should note that it is a smaller car than the Ford Focus. Neither the Focus not the Polo uses as sophisticated technology as the Prius but both are affordable cars in contrast to the Prius.

Peter_XX

BTW, I would consider Audi A2 3L from MY 2000 (CO2: 81 g/km)as the real benchmark to beat.

Dilyan Marinov

I was referring to Lexus CT200h.
87 g/km is only 12% better than 99 g/km, but the way to reach it is definitely not extremely close.

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