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Audi A1 e-tron wins Silvretta Electric Car Rally

Audi is this year’s overall winner of the second Silvretta Electric Car Rally in Austria’s Montafon region. The 2011 victory of the A1 e-tron range-extended electric vehicle follows the Audi R8 e-tron’s win last year. The second Audi in the rally, a Q5 HFC with a fuel cell finished in sixth place. A total of 32 electric vehicles were evaluated.

After three days, 307 kilometers (191 miles) and a total altitude difference of 11,541 meters (7.2 miles), the A1 e-tron bearing the number 206 was named the winner of the second Silvretta Electric Car Rally Montafon. The event took place from 7-9 July as part of the 14th Silvretta Classic. The name Silvretta refers to a group of mountains in the eastern Alps of Austria.

The A1 e-tron contains technology that Audi’s development engineers are using to study the mobility requirements for such a future-oriented concept. The technological basis includes an electric motor with a maximum output of 75 kW that is powered by a lithium-ion battery. The battery features a 12 kWh capacity and can be completely charged in 30 minutes (quick charge), or in less than three hours (standard charge). It offers a range of 50 kilometers (31 miles). The A1 e-tron also comes equipped with a range-extending combustion engine, which can charge the battery as needed. The one-disc rotary engine (254 cc) is located under the trunk floor; it provides 15 kW of output intended solely to charge the battery, rather than to directly power the wheels.

During the rally the A1 e-tron was driven by Franciscus van Meel, Head of Electromobility Strategy at AUDI AG. Long-time Audi employee Gerhard Gruber took on the important role of co-driver.

Sending an electric car into the Alps is one of the toughest challenges you can present it with. The fact that the A1 e-tron proved so impressive here is especially gratifying to me and it proves we’re on the right track with our electric mobility approach of combining an electric motor with a combustion engine.

—Franciscus van Meel

Comments

kelly

Mass-produce baby, mass-produce

HarveyD

They have proved that PHEVs do NOT need large ICE gensets. If you can drive in the the Alps with a mini 254 cc genset and a rather small battery pack, you should be able to drive anywhere.

SJC

I remember when I questioned the Volt's ability to climb for prolonged periods, certain experts here claimed it was no problem. When the final Volt came out it had a mountain mode.

Reel$$

The battery features a 12 kWh capacity and can be completely charged in 30 minutes (quick charge), or in less than three hours (standard charge). It offers a range of 50 kilometers (31 miles).

Good AER for only 12 kWh. VW could make these all over the world.

Reel$$

The battery features a 12 kWh capacity and can be completely charged in 30 minutes (quick charge), or in less than three hours (standard charge). It offers a range of 50 kilometers (31 miles).

Good AER for only 12 kWh. VW could make these all over the world.

Darius

SJC,

The mountain mode for Chevy Volt is useless. Everybody who owns Chevy Volt says that. The Chevy Volt engine is overpowered since Chevy Volt is parallel hybrid. Audi a1 e-tron could be first series hybrid.

SJC

I do not know if it has use, I merely point out its existence. It exists for a reason that others said was totally unnecessary. If it was unnecessary, why does it exist?

Reel$$

Er, Darius - not according to Plugin Cars:

http://www.plugincars.com/chevy-volts-mountain-mode-vastly-underrated-yields-new-driving-strategies-107176.html

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