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Nevada deploys first US commercial, grid-connected enhanced geothermal system

The US Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the nation’s first commercial enhanced geothermal system (EGS) project to supply electricity to the grid. Based in Churchill County, Nevada, Ormat Technologies’ Desert Peak 2 EGS project has increased power output of its nearby operating geothermal field by nearly 38%, providing an additional 1.7 megawatts of power to the grid.

Geothermal101_final2-01
EGS infographic. Source: DOE. Click to enlarge.

Enhanced geothermal system projects capture power from hot rocks, buried thousands of feet below the surface, that lack the permeability or fluid saturation found in naturally occurring geothermal systems. EGS technologies utilize directional drilling and pressurized water to enhance flow paths in the subsurface rock and create new reservoirs, capturing energy from resources that were once considered uneconomical or unrecoverable.

The US Geological Survey estimates that EGS in the United States has the potential to enable development of 100 to 500 gigawatts (GW) of geothermal resource capacity.

Leveraging a $5.4-million Energy Department investment, matched by $2.6 million in private sector funding, the Ormat Desert Peak project is extending the life of previously unproductive geothermal wells. Since the project’s start in 2008, the Energy Department has worked with Ormat, GeothermEx, the US Geological Survey, and Lawrence Berkeley and Sandia National Laboratories to develop cost-effective and innovative production technologies that utilize protective environmental best practices and monitoring.

The Desert Peak project follows achievements at two other Energy Department-supported projects focused on demonstrating the commercial viability of EGS: The Calpine demonstration project at The Geysers in Middletown, California and the AltaRock demonstration project at the Newberry Volcano near Bend, Oregon. These projects have realized important achievements in the Department’s near- to long-term EGS strategy to develop resources ranging from existing fields to undeveloped or greenfield sites.

Comments

ejj

"EGS technologies utilize directional drilling and pressurized water to enhance flow paths in the subsurface rock and create new reservoirs, capturing energy from resources that were once considered uneconomical or unrecoverable."

Whoa, whoa, whoa....this sounds like FRACKING - the evil, rotten, scary practice of FRACKING being used for geothermal energy...oh wait....

Alain

I wonder if these power stations could also be used for carbon sequestration. If pressurised CO2 is added to the cold feeding water, the carbonic acid would dissolve Ca and Mg ions in the rocks and either remain there or return in the hot water as carbonates, which will solidify after the pressure drop and evaporation of the fluid. They can then easily be disposed off. Leaching of the rocks may even be advantageous since it would make the flow of water easier. It could even be a benign resource of interesting metals.

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