Delphi advancing Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression-Ignition engine concept; new two-stage supercharger/turbocharger boost system
Ballard ships 500th ElectraGen-ME methanol fuel cell system for telecom backup

Toyota wraps up 3-year Strasbourg Prius PHV demo project; average 46% reduction in fuel consumption compared to gasoline ICE vehicles

Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has completed its three-year plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHV) demonstration project jointly carried out with Électricité de France (EDF) and the City and the Urban Community of Strasbourg in France.

The partners revealed the final conclusions collected from this large-scale demonstration, in which approximately 70 units of the Prius PHV were provided to Strasbourg. Data was accumulated by utilizing the 145 dedicated charging stations installed in the city by EDF to identify vehicles and exchange information. The vehicles travelled more than a total of 4 million kilometers (2.485 million miles) during the project. Among the findings were:

  • The plug-ins achieved an average 46% reduction in fuel consumption compared to conventional gasoline vehicle of similar size with an average charging frequency of 1.1 times a day.

  • A direct correlation between the recharging frequency and fuel consumption: higher charging frequency leads to lower fuel consumption.

    For example, Toyota said, take a user that recharges 1.6 times a day. While driving 40% in hybrid mode and 60% in electric mode, the user obtains levels of approximately 70% of reduction in fuel consumption compared to a conventional gasoline vehicle of similar size. This represents an estimated saving of €1,400 (US$1,800) on an annual basis, assuming that the car drives around 20,000 km (12,400 miles) a year.

  • 60% of the recharges are carried out at work and 37% at home. Public charging points are welcomed by users for supplementary charging. Scheduled charging leads to CO2 emissions reductions of 10% to 15%.

  • Average cost of recharge is around €0.30 (US$0.40) (all costs included).

  • Up to 61% of CO2 emissions can be reduced compared to conventional gasoline cars of similar size.

Thanks to the participation from the citizens of Strasbourg, Toyota was able to acquire valuable data for the further promotion of PHV technologies. Based on the results that were obtained from this demonstration project, we intend to offer technologies more accessible for widespread adoption.

—Michel Gardel, vice-president of communications and external and environmental affairs at Toyota Motor Europe NV/SA

Toyota launched the Prius Plug-in in Japan at the beginning of 2012, followed by introductions in North America and Europe. To date, around 31,100 plug-ins have been sold, equivalent to 1.5 times the number of Prius sold in a full year when launched in 2000. For Europe, the year-to-date figure amounts to 4,417 units, with sales starting only end of summer 2012.

EDF, with the support of its subsidiary Electricité de Strasbourg (ES group), incorporated innovative features into the charging infrastructure put in place for the project. One of these features automatically shifts vehicle charging time to off-peak period, benefiting from reduced power costs. In addition, an internet based monitoring service enabled users to verify that the average cost of a recharge did not exceed €0.30.

To make the system even more customer friendly, EDF and its subsidiary, Sodetrel, developed a smartphone application to geolocate charging points and check their availability.

The Urban Community of Strasbourg is now moving forward to engage in the cross border program CROME (Cross Border Mobility for Electric Vehicle). New outlets meeting European standards for electric vehicles have been installed, some allowing full charge of an electric vehicle within two hours. Both users of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles will benefit from these new charging points.

Comments

mahonj

France is a perfect candidate for electric cars - they have very low carbon electricity as they have 74% nuclear and 16% hydro.
Also, they have no native oil, so there is little political defence for oil.

The great thing with PHEVs is that if you cannot get to a charger, it doesn't matter, you just burn more petrol, you don't end up stuck on the side of a motorway, or queuing at a charging station.

Just keep working on the price.

Kit P

“12,400 miles ”

Let me get out the calculator (not that I need one) and debunk this junk science.

60% x 12,400 miles = 7500 miles or 20 miles a day.

“US$1,800 ”

Okay then let me estimate saving. Many of you lie about what mileage you get with your Pious so:

7500 miles/ 45 miles per gal = 166 gal

If I pay $3.50 per gal about $600 per year savings. I driver less but my PU gets worse mileage so I could save $700 a year.

Of course I still have to pay $200 or so for electricity. The saving is now down to $500 per year and I have not spent $15k on batteries yet to get me between charging points. That is a 30 year pay back period.

So what is the benefit of this really bad economic choice?

“Up to 61% of CO2 emissions can be reduced compared to conventional gasoline cars of similar size. ”

Or 20% worse for every place burning coal which is everyplace but France.

“France is a perfect candidate for electric cars ”

Are the French gullible?

Davemart

@Kit P:
You perhaps do not realise that Strasbourg is not located in the US, hard though that is to believe.
Petrol there does not cost $3.50 US gallon.

HarveyD

Leave it to Kit P to distort reality by 100+% both ways.

Herm

also the batteries in a plug-in Pious is not $15k, they are only 4kWh and it displaces the normal nimh pack, but Toyota does charge an arm&leg for the PIP.. they are now heavily discounting them down to the level of a regular Prius. I'm going to take all your future comments with a grain of salt.. unfortunately.

Kit P

“grain of salt. ”

The nice folks who do not like what I say have something in common. First they do not actually own a BEV and provide real data that might persuade some reading this blog to change to think about buying one.

It must be my fault they are hypocrites.

Second they do not provide an alternate calculation.

@t Davemart

“does not cost $3.50 US gallon ”

If Shell can import gasoline to the back woods where I live for $3.50 US gallon why is gas more expensive in France? In the US, the primary reason for gas to be a different price is state taxes.

If a government want to tax the hell out of something, it is not my business unless it is my government. However, if you tell me it is economical based on artificial government polices, I invite you to move there.

@Herm
“also the batteries in a plug-in Pious is not $15k ”

So you are telling me that I can go down and buy a PHEV for only how much more than a Corolla?

I have a lot of respect for Toyota marketing. They are targeting Herm not me. Toyota and Honda already know that I will buy either a Civic or Corolla if they keep building reliable cars.

This study is the first time I have seen Toyota even try to do a study. I would not buy a Toyota study, it is not very good.

Davemart

Kit P:
You really seem to enjoy making yourself a laughing stock.
You firstly came out with extreme statements that the study is innumerate rubbish, and then went on to use figures for gasoline prices which pertain to the US, not France.

Instead of admitting your error, you then seek to blather on to cover up the fact that you don't know what you are talking about and the figures you used were nonsense.

I don't know what other stupidities you have committed either in your original post or this one, as I did not bother reading the rest.

The clue is, when you are found to have been talking nonsense, man up, or if you are too weak to do that, at least shut up.

Continuing to post more drivel simply increases the contempt your original absolutely daft comment inspires.

kelly

@kp, "..assuming that the car drives around 20,000 km (12,400 miles) a year." the .6 mile = 1 km is already reduced(not to 7500 miles) - so your calculations are wrong again.

Because a backwoods-acting oil-bribed government subsidizes oil wars and pollution(and nuclear) instead full costing gasoline/energy, like Europe, doesn't mean $8-10/gallon gas isn't closer to accurate.

Nor have US subsidies kept oil prices from doubling repeatedly, as they have ever since the 1973 oil 'crisis'.

HarveyD

Gasoline is at half price in USA for many well known reasons, including:

1. huge $$$B subsidies to Big Oil from Federal and States.
2. huge tax credits from all government levels.
3. huge cost ($3+T) of Oil Wars not included in gasoline price.
4. very low Fed gas tax. ($0.18/gal?)
5. discounted 2,7500,000 barrels/day; $73/barrel crude from Alberta instead of $95/barrel.
6. high tariff on imported ethanol ($0.56/gal) to promote local Oil.
7. huge costly support/credits etc for ethanol production.
8. low or no income, property, school taxes for Oil Cos.

If all direct and indirect cost were added in, the retail price of gasoline in USA would be much closer to EU's average price of about $7.40/US gal.

ai_vin

Harvey, I saw something awhile back that said if all direct and indirect costs were added in, the retail price of gasoline in USA would be more than $15/US gal.

Google "real cost of gasoline"

Kit P

“laughing stock. ”

Ouch! That hurts.

“so your calculations are wrong again. ”

Let me check!

“60% in electric mode ”

So my calculation is not wrong but Kelly has again demonstrated the inability to read. Go back and read the information. Use your claimed skills as an engineer and an MBA to present a case instead of ranting about 1973.

Lim

A saving of $1,800 for 7,440 miles (60% of 12,400
driving miles) corresponds to about $0.24/mile for "a
conventional gasoline vehicle of similar size" which
would then averages about 31mpg assuming an EU gas
price of $7.5/gal.

The 31mpg seems about right for "a conventional
gasoline vehicle of similar size" so it looks that the
study was based on real mileage and (EU) cost.

Roger Pham


Regarding the $1,800 USD saved by the Prius yearly, Lim has it almost right, while KP is again, "way off!"
When in doubt, re-read the article again, here as I quote:

>>>>>"For example, Toyota said, take a user that recharges 1.6 times a day. While driving 40% in hybrid mode and 60% in electric mode, the user obtains levels of approximately 70% of reduction in fuel consumption compared to a conventional gasoline vehicle of similar size. This represents an estimated saving of €1,400 (US$1,800) on an annual basis, assuming that the car drives around 20,000 km (12,400 miles) a year."

So, the money-saving comparison is between the Prius PHV vs another conventional ICEV, not between Prius all electric mode vs Prius hybrid mode! Let's say a comparable ICEV is capable of 30 mpg, and driven 12,400 miles/yr consumes = 413 gallons US. A saving of 70% is 413 x .7 = 289 gallons. So, $1,800 USD saved over 289 gallons would make it $6.22 USD/gallon US.
(continued below)


Roger Pham

(continued from above as I try to overcome WP censor!)
Price check for gasoline price in Fr* 2013 reveals 1.75 Eu/liter = 6.56 Euro/gallon US. Exchange rate is from this article: 1400 Euro = 1800 USD, so 6.56 Euro /1400 x 1800 = $8.43 USD/Gallon US. Ouch!
Wait a minute, so the referenced ICEV in this article must be able to achieve more than 30 mpg. It must have achieved: 30 mpg x $8.43/$6.22 = 40 mpg, that of an European Econobox! which is a more than fair comparison, in which the Prius is larger than a 40-mpg European econobox, yet able to beat its fuel cost by $1,800 per year! Wow!!!

Roger Pham

A more likely situation is that the referenced ICEV was assumed to have ~30 mpg, and that the discrepancy between the calculated $6.22/gal vs. the actual $8.43/gal of gasoline is due to the cost of electricity required for charging the Prius PHV for 60% of the time, and perhaps the depreciation cost of the battery is also figured into this also? This is the most likely scenario.

kelly

@kp, again - you have no clue.

The point is that "since 1973", the price of oil went from $3/barrel to over $100/barrel - which has destroyed the world economy, besides the climate change.

The average American has NOT seen his income rise by over 3300 percent.

The public should limit, then dump all the centralized energy thieves. A few $thousand in solar panels will reduce personal electric utility bills, besides charging EVs and reducing/ending massive corporate oil gouging.

Monopolies always steal all they can.

kelly

@kp, another study

http://cleantechnica.com/2013/04/07/nissan-juke-vs-nissan-leaf-cost-comparisons/

Comparison #2 Assumptions:
Live in California.
$4.00/gallon of gas.
12¢/kWh of electricity.
13,476 miles driven per year.
Leaf: 99 MPGe / Juke: 29 MPG.
Result:
Nissan Leaf is cheaper within 1st year of ownership (and ever after). Save almost $10,000 after 5 years of ownership.

The EV cost of ownership is much less than a gasoline vehicle - like a electric refrigerator is cheaper than your gasoline fridge(or is it a nuclear one?)

kelly

@kp, another study

http://cleantechnica.com/2013/04/07/nissan-juke-vs-nissan-leaf-cost-comparisons/

Comparison #2 Assumptions:
Live in California.
$4.00/gallon of gas.
12¢/kWh of electricity.
13,476 miles driven per year.
Leaf: 99 MPGe / Juke: 29 MPG.
Result:
Nissan Leaf is cheaper within 1st year of ownership (and ever after). Save almost $10,000 after 5 years of ownership.

The EV cost of ownership is much less than a gasoline vehicle - like a electric refrigerator is cheaper than your gasoline fridge(or is it a nuclear one?)

Kit P

@Lim
“The 31mpg seems about right for "a conventional gasoline vehicle of similar size" ”

I certainly agree that is about what our Corolla does. It is also the incorrect comparison. The correct comparison is HEV compared to PHEV.

“price of $7.5/gal ”

That is the price including tax. The payback still indicates a PHEV is a very poor choice even if you assume $1800 savings.

“$1,800 per year! Wow!!! ”.

Over and over we hear Roger buy hook line and sinker automaker claims about savings. The way I save money is to spend less to start with.

“which has destroyed the world economy, besides the climate change. ”

The world economy seems to have done very well since 1973. The climate has not changed either.

“Monopolies always steal all they can. ”

Oil companies are not monopolies. I get my power and water from a utility that is my only choice unless I want to it myself which is an option in a free society. I am very happy with the service. The people who provide those services.

I have done work for Kelly utility and I certainly found them to be honest and hard working. On the other hand, Kelly spends a lot of time accusing others with no evidence to support his claims.

“A few $thousand in solar panels ..”

Well actually it was $16k on top of the $500/month lease. Our family car is a Corolla and we own a snow shovel. Excuse if I do not think driving a BMW is San Diego is the norm for the US.

Kit P

“another study ”

Not a study per se. Here we have a case of some clown journalist making up stuff. Comparing a 200 hp SUV that you take the kids skiing to a 100 hp car that is good for driving to work and church seems a bit odd.

Then there is

“After taking the $7,500 federal tax credit ..”

Under the category of odd is rich people talking about 'saving' money by buying things that they do not need.

HarveyD

In the land of Free Enterprise (and in China), gasoline prices are directly and/or indirectly falsified. It has nothing to do with the sacred supply and demand guiding principles.

As ai_win reported, if Big Oil and users had to pay all direct and indirect cost including all environment, extra health care, extra security-war and fair 10+% Fed & States sales taxes etc etc, the retail price of gasoline would already be above $14/gal.

Above $10/gal for gasoline/diesel, HEVs, PHEVs and BEVs would be taking off and sales of ICEVs would drop rather quickly.

Kit P

“gasoline prices are directly and/or indirectly falsified ”

So when I am thinking about taking a trip to see family, I should estimate the cost based on what Harvey, ai_vin, and kelly thinks?

When you look at all the 'indirect cost' claims there seems to be a huge strech on logic. Since I have owned our newest ICE, we have never seen any place with a pollution problem. Even visited NYC and California. The environmental impact of driving a car is the same with batteries. So clearly my choice of an ICE has no 'indirect cost'.

kelly

@kp, you must be paid by nuclear/oil interests to write your lies.

Everyone knows electric devices consistently fall in price while improving.

Solar panels decrease in cost, increase in performance - as has the flat screen TV and electronic PC you spout your nonsense with on the electronic internet.

Also, electronics has no/few moving parts/little maintenance, and doesn't have 100's of percent cost overruns, to match the 100's of years of oil pollution and 100's of years of unsolved nuclear waste radiation half life.

This is a main reason why 90% efficient EV motors are less expensive than 20% efficient ICE, as shown in study after study.

The EV advantage gets greater with every passing year.

Nuclear has financing only by government 'loan guaranties' and new construction permits are ban in more and more democracies.

$Billions in cost overruns and $trillions in damage mean nothing to oil and nuclear - beyond deliberately dumping these criminal hidden costs, especially pollution's medical costs, on the consumer.

ai_vin

The climate has not changed either.

I'll add that statement to the ones he made praising George Bush & Dick Cheney - just so we all know where he's coming from.

ai_vin

The world economy seems to have done very well since 1973.

I'm tempted to say he's ignoring the Great Recession but here he is relating oil prices & global economy. The fact is high oil prices do not hamper the world economy - but rapidly raising prices do!

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)