OSU team develops new aqueous lithium-iodine solar flow battery; 20% energy savings over Li-I batteries
Total alternative fuel vehicle reg in Europe up 17.4% in Q2 2015, EVs up 53%; EVs up 78.4% for H1

Tokyo team reveals 3D structure and mechanism of key cellulosic biofuel enzyme

A University of Tokyo research group has revealed the three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action of a key enzyme for cellulosic biofuel production, cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP).

This research is extremely interesting from a scientific perspective, but could also contribute to the development of biorefinery technologies that produce biofuels such as ethanol and other useful compounds via biomass degradation by microbes.

—Professor Shinya Fushinobu

It has been long thought that hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases) were the main contributors to microbial degradation of cellulose. Recently, the existence of oxidative cellulose-degrading enzymes that dramatically increase the activity efficiency of cellulases have been noted. When these enzymes degrade cellulose, cellobionic acid is produced. However, it was completely unknown how the cellulolytic microbes further metabolize this compound.

In 2013, one of the members of the research group, Associate Professor Hiroyuki Nakai at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, discovered a new enzyme, cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP).

CBAP catalyzes the degradation of cellobionic acid to produce compounds that are prone to further metabolism and fermentation. Therefore, this enzyme is a missing link between the oxidative cellulose degradation and bioethanol fermentation pathways in microorganisms. However, the three dimensional structure of the enzyme and the mechanism by which it degraded cellobionic acid remained unknown.

In this latest research, the research group lead by Professor Shinya Fushinobu at the University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, used X-ray crystallography to reveal the three-dimensional structure of CBAP isolated from marine bacteria. In addition, the structure of CBAP in complex with cellobionic acid was determined, and the reaction mechanism for decomposing cellobionic acid was revealed.

Resources

  • Young-Woo Nam, Takanori Nihira, Takatoshi Arakawa, Yuka Saito, Motomitsu Kitaoka, Hiroyuki Nakai, and Shinya Fushinobu (2015) “Crystal structure and substrate recognition of cellobionic acid phosphorylase playing a key role in oxidative cellulose degradation by microbes” The Journal of Biological Chemistry Vol. 290, No. 30, pg 18281-18292, doi: 10.1074/jbc.M115.664664

Comments

The comments to this entry are closed.