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VW bringing EA211 1.4L turbo direct-injection engine to Jetta range in US

Volkswagen is introducing the 1.4-liter EA211 four-cylinder turbocharged and direct-injection TSI engine into the Jetta range, replacing the previous naturally aspirated 2.0-liter engine that was used in the S model and the 1.8T TSI engine in the SE model. This brings implementation of intelligent downsizing to more than 97% of vehicles sold by Volkswagen in the US, available across all the models on sale.

The engine will be mated to either a five-speed manual or a six-speed automatic transmission: manufacturer estimated fuel economy on the highway is predicted to be 39 mpg with the six-speed automatic transmission, an improvement of 13% over the EPA estimated highway fuel economy for the previous 2.0-liter engine and 7% over the 1.8T.

The 1.4-liter gasoline engine is one of Volkswagen’s latest EA211 series of small engines, featuring lightweight aluminum construction; an integrated (into the head) exhaust manifold; and a toothed-belt drive for its double overhead camshaft valvetrain that incorporates variable intake and exhaust timing. The only aspect to be carried over from the EA111 engine that preceded it is the 82 mm cylinder spacing.

Ea211_14_tsi_engine_5122

The cylinder bore was decreased by 2 mm (to 74.5mm) while the stroke was increased to 80mm, a change which not only helps compactness, but also increases torque and presents an ideal platform for adding boost (turbocharging or supercharging).

The 1.4-liter TSI engine in the Jetta features a 10.0:1 compression ratio, direct fuel injection, and turbocharging to produce 150 hp (112 kW) at 5000 rpm. This engine’s turbocharging system offers strong boost response due to its cleverly designed intake manifold, which enables the use of a surprisingly small, single-scroll compressor.

The intercooler, uniquely, is integrated directly into the injection-molded induction pipe. This design generates maximum torque of 184 lb-ft (249 N·m) at 1400 rpm.

Comments

thomas p

If this was a diesel, it'd be something

Sotaro

Does this paragraph make any sense to you?

"The cylinder bore was decreased by 2 mm (to 74.5mm) while the stroke was increased to 80mm, a change which not only helps compactness, but also increases torque and presents an ideal platform for adding boost (turbocharging or supercharging)."

Since the cylinder spacing is unchanged at 88mm, only the outer 2 cylinders would affect the length and width. The maximum potential reduction in radius would be 1 mm twice equaling 2 mm shorter and 2 mm narrower.

From what engine is the reduction of bore of 2 mm measured? And the stroke increase?

torque has little to do with a longer stroke. Longer stroke has a lot to do with combustion efficiency, especially at higher compression ratios.

"...presents an ideal platform for adding boost (turbocharging or supercharging)." I assume this has is artistic license and has no basis in science.

Other than the article, it sounds like a nice engine. It would be nice to have more than a press release. How about weight, cost, size, and brake specific fuel consumption?

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