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H2 Logic delivers 9th H2 fueling station for Denmark; 100% renewable hydrogen, 1st country-wide station network

H2 Logic has delivered the ninth hydrogen fueling station in Denmark. The latest site was inaugurated in Kolding. This narrows the driving distance to the nearest station in Hamburg, Germany to only 245 km (150 miles) making cross-border driving on hydrogen more feasible. The station in Kolding is the third to open in Denmark during the past six months, and in total the ninth public accessible hydrogen station in 24/7 operation throughout Denmark.

Additional H2Stations are planned during 2016 which will ensure that 50% of Danish population will have less than 15 kilometers to hydrogen fueling. Already today hydrogen available is in all of the major cities across the country, making it the first countrywide hydrogen station network in the world.

Map-dk

The hydrogen station in Kolding will be used by a fleet of Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles from Hyundai delivered to various local users, among others the City of Kolding.

The Kolding station is operated by Danish Hydrogen Fuel A/S (DHF), a joint-venture between the oil company OK, gas company Strandmøllen and H2 Logic. DHF targets to build up to five hydrogen fuelling stations in Denmark, where the Kolding station is the third in operation.

The station is placed at a conventional fuelling station operated by OK and located right next to the major highway connecting the southern part of Denmark with Germany.

Hydrogen for the Kolding station is delivered from a central electrolyzer plant operated by Strandmøllen and based on technology from the H2 Logic sister company NEL-Hydrogen. The entire Danish hydrogen station network is based entirely on hydrogen produced from electrolysis and electricity procured with CO2 certificates. This ensures a 100% sustainable and zero emission hydrogen supply—the highest share in the world for an entire station network.

OK17

H2logic
H2Station hydrogen fueling station in Kolding, Denmark. Click to enlarge.

The Kolding station, as well as the remainder of the Danish network is based on H2Station technology from H2 Logic that provides 70MPa fast fuelling in accordance with international standards. H2Station technology has a long proven track-record of reliable operation and is used on a daily basis in several European countries.

The hydrogen station in Kolding is part of the H2ME demonstration project supported by the European FCH program and the Danish Energy Agency supported H2DK project.

Comments

Davemart

So much for the notion that it would be impossible to roll out adequate fuelling infrastructure then.

And in other news, stations of more comparable size to petrol stations are no problem:

'Shell and Linde have been co-operating in the build-up of a hydrogen refuelling infrastructure for many years. Joint projects include Shell’s first hydrogen station in Germany, which has the capacity to fill up to 250 fuel cell vehicles per day. The station at Sachsendamm in Berlin is one of the most productive in the world.'

https://fuelcellsworks.com/news/linde-to-showcase-its-hydrogen-leadership-at-2016-shell-eco-marathon/

And so much for the polemic that hydrogen is fossil fuel burn by another name:

'The entire Danish hydrogen station network is based entirely on hydrogen produced from electrolysis and electricity procured with CO2 certificates. This ensures a 100% sustainable and zero emission hydrogen supply—the highest share in the world for an entire station network.'

Account Deleted

And this hydrogen nonsense is heavily subsidised with the Danish taxpayer’s money. Take that away and this research project will fall apart. Tesla has covered Denmark with superchargers without getting any subsidies. Hydrogen should not be any different.

HarveyD

A hand to Denmark with the first country wide clean H2 stations network. FCEV owners will soon have a refill station within 15 Km.

Considering the extended range of FCEVs, this type of station density should be enough for first generation FCEVs. More and/or larger H2 stations can be added on an as required basis.

An example to follow!!!

Davemart

Henrik said:

' Tesla has covered Denmark with superchargers without getting any subsidies.'

Its good to know you have not lost your sense of humour.

Elon 'subsidy' Musk has even got the odd few tens of millions for his battery swapping sham.

ai_vin

"Country-wide station network" isn't saying much when you consider how small Denmark is.

Roger Pham

@Henrik,
This is not "hydrogen nonsense." Denmark has 40% of the grid being wind energy that is intermittent. Denmark has to depend on neighboring countries to dump excess wind energy, while having to import oil for transportation. Much better to be able to make H2 for transportation fuel from excess wind to avoid having to dump excess wind for next to nothing, then costing money to pay for imported oil.

Roger K. Brown
Much better to be able to make H2 for transportation fuel from excess wind to avoid having to dump excess wind for next to nothing, then costing money to pay for imported oil.

Electrolyzers are fairly expensive pieces of equipment. Wind capacity factors are in the range of 30 to 40%. Using only the excess wind capacity that does not fit into current grid demand would lead to very low capacity factors for the electrolyzers. I think that this scenario for electrolzyer use is unlikely.

SJC

Many of the 20 hydrogen stations planned in California use renewable power contracts.

Roger Pham

http://www.hydrogen.no/maritim-bergen-sept2014/NEL%20Hydrogen%20Efficient%20H2%20production%20with%20Norwegian%20electrolyser%20technology,%20Henning%20Lang%C3%A5s.pdf

On page 15 of above reference, the CAPEX per kW for a large-scale electrolyzer plant is around 600 Euro per kW. Assume the same durability of the electrolyzer plant as the wind turbine, with CAPEX of around 1,800 Euro per kW, then the cost per kW of H2 is only 1/3 that of electricity cost.

For example, let's say wind electricity costs 5 cents per kWh, then every kW of electricity goes thru the electrolizer will incur an additional 1.7 cents per kW to pay for the electrolyzer's amortized cost. Adding operational cost the the CAPEX of 1.7 cents per kW, and the cost of H2 could be around 2 cents per kW. So, 7 cents per kW to make H2. If 50 kWh is required to make 1 kg of H2, then each kg of H2 would cost 3.5 euros before compression and distribution and profit...etc. Not bad at all.

If summer solar energy is also fed into the same electrolyzer in order to double the capacity factor of the electrolyzer, then it may only costs 1 cent per kWh of amortized cost, so 1 kg of H2 will end up costing 3.0 Euro per kg.

Wind is strong in Spring, Falls and Winters, while Solar is strong is Summer, late Spring and Early FAll. Wind is strong at night while solar is present during the day. Wind and solar can complement each other to double capacity factor of the electrolyzer plant.

HarveyD

The idea would be to over equip Wind and Solar facilities (as done with many Hydro facilities) and to use surplus lower cost clean energy to produce and store clean lower cost H2.

REs should be used most of the time with complementary NGPPs on an as required basis only.

In our area, the energy sources would be Hydro (95%) and Wind (5%). The relative percentage will progressively change to 90% - 10% by 2025/2030 or so.

SJC

"The station is placed at a conventional fueling station.."
There is no reason electrolysis powered by renewable energy can not be located at existing fueling stations.

HarveyD

Most highway liquid fuel stations are large and could be modified to accommodate/share space with e-charging and H2 storage/refill facilities. The smaller one could be expanded?

Since e-charging facilities are much slower (up to 30 minutes instead of 5 minutes), they would have to occupy more space (probably further away from restaurants and rest facilities) because users would have more time to kill.

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