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Momentum Dynamics says it will deliver 200 kW wireless charging for bus market this year

Wireless charging company Momentum Dynamics (earlier post) says it will deliver 200kW wireless (inductive) charging systems in 2016 for the municipal bus market.

According to CEO Andrew Daga, the company previously delivered 25 kilowatt (kW) and 50 kW charging systems to strategic partners in the automotive industry in 2015, and said the move to its 200 kW system is a natural progression to meet a critical market need. Even higher power systems are in development.

Daga said the company is planning to deliver two wireless charging systems to municipal agencies this year in Maryland and Washington state. Wireless chargers use resonant magnetic induction to transfer power without the use of cables. They include the transmitter on the ground and a power receiver mounted to the underside of the vehicle. Momentum says it can support an air gap of up to 12".

In March, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reported the successful demonstration of a 20 kW wireless charging system with 90% efficiency. The researchers are already looking ahead to their next target of 50-kilowatt wireless charging, which would match the power levels of commercially available plug-in quick chargers. (Earlier post.)

Standards for wireless charging—e.g., SAE J2954 (earlier post)—are still under development.

Comments

HarveyD

At 200+ KW, wireless chargers will soon compete with wired units? The 5% difference in total efficiency is compensated by more convenience.

An appropriate snow ad ice melting heating system will be required in our area but is doable.

Account Deleted

It is not 5% it is nearly 10% in efficiency loss. Convenience is the same weather a robotic arm connects a wire or it is done wirelessly. 200kw wireless is not coming to cars any time soon as it weight hundreds of kilos and takes up lots of space.

HarveyD

Ultra light weight pick up coils will be available by 2020/2022.

Top wired ultra quick chargers are no where near 100% efficient! They may average 95% to 96%?

Henry Gibson

You would not be amused at the expense of the demand rate the power company would charge the whole month for a single 200 KW charge. High rate chargers should be natural gas powered engines. ..HG..

Henry Gibson

Do like others; put two bars above the road.

HarveyD

Ultra quick (30 to 60 minutes) wireless charging facilities at highway rest-stops (and other equivalent places) may find many users.

Lower capability (Level II) wireless charging facilities are ideal for home units and other places where people normally stay for 2+ hours.

Arnold

20KW for heavy vehicles @ 90% eff is not that use full.

They are targeting route buses ONLY with the 12" gap as they can use a fixed receiving coil so no complicated expensive and easily damaged moving parts.

Not sure how they can match this with the height adjustable function seen on many buses, but assume the 12" refers to the lowered chassis (stationary) setting.

The road surface must be monitored and everything precisely verified free of obstacles to avoid collisions with the road surface.

This is nowhere near viable or ready for general deployment other than for a very few 'ideal routes' for which it will work as described.

The upside
At 20KW the lay stations can be set up with modest storage battery or capacitor bank combo etc for the relatively short demand times ~ 5-10 to 30 minutes. Ideal for solar storage terminus roofs other low current supply etc.

Arnold

I say 20KW because that is the current state of play and the proposed 50KW will NOT match current ***commercial vehicle
***.... chargers *note the difference.
They are pushing the 'spin' factor a bit hard here.

"In March, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reported the successful demonstration of a 20 kW wireless charging system with 90% efficiency. The researchers are already looking ahead to their next target of 50-kilowatt wireless charging, which would match the power levels of ***commercially available*** plug-in quick chargers."

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