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CARB certifies ROUSH CleanTech propane engine to .05 g/bhp-hr NOx

ROUSH CleanTech has developed the first propane autogas engine available in class 4-7 vehicles and Blue Bird Type C buses certified to the optional low NOx level .05 g/bhp-hr. These new Environmental Protection Agency- and California Air Resources Board-certified propane engines are 75% cleaner than the current emissions standard.

Nitrogen oxides are a group of gases known as a primary contributor to acid rain, smog and other air quality issues. The EPA states that exposure to NOx can trigger health problems such as asthma and other respiratory issues. CARB has encouraged heavy-duty engine manufacturers to reduce levels below the current mandatory EPA standard of .2 grams per brake horsepower per hour (known as g/bhp-hr).

The certification covers ROUSH CleanTech 6.8L V10 3V propane engines for school bus and commercial truck engines with no additional upfront cost. ROUSH CleanTech has begun installing the new low NOx engines in its Ford commercial vehicles and Blue Bird Vision propane school buses with 2017MY engines.

Over the past year, NOx awareness has increased due to the Volkswagen emissions compliance issue. The Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust was created to fund actions with cleaner technology that reduce excess emissions of NOx.

Our .05g NOx engine certification will help our school bus and public transit customers target funds from the upcoming VW Environmental Mitigation Trust program. This is especially beneficial for school districts looking for extra funds to replace aging diesel models.

—Todd Mouw, vice president of sales and marketing for ROUSH CleanTech

Comments

Lad

Compared to a battery electric drive line, fossil gas is far more costly to operate. Switching to batteries produces a bus that will operate long into the future; whereas the gas bus is already obsolete.

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