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Honda to focus on PHEVs, development of battery-electrics in addition to fuel cell vehicles; 2/3 of sales electrified by 2030

At a press meeting in Tokyo, Honda Motor Co., Ltd. President & CEO Takahiro Hachigo discussed the future direction of Honda, including various products and technologies and the company’s new 2030 Vision.

Hachigo said that Honda aims to electrify two-thirds of global automobile unit sales in 2030. The company will put a central focus on hybrid-based models utilizing a high-efficiency plug-in hybrid system unique to Honda. As for zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs), Honda will strengthen the development of battery-electric vehicles in addition to fuel cell electric vehicles (FCV).

In addition to a China-exclusive model scheduled to go on sale in 2018, a dedicated EV model for other regions is also currently under development. Honda will introduce this model at an auto show this fall.

Hachigo noted that to increase development speed further, the company is strengthening its system and capability for the development of electrified vehicles. In October of last year, it established within Honda R&D an Electric Vehicle Development Division, a specialized team which will be in charge of developing the entire vehicle including the powertrain and body.

On the two-wheel front, Honda is striving to promote the electrification of commuter models, and plans to introduce some new models including an electric scooter in 2018.

Honda is currently working on the research and development of a highly-convenient system for electric commuters, which features a detachable mobile battery that is easy to replace and/or recharge. Honda is considering demonstration testing of this mobile battery in collaboration with the Japan Post Co., Ltd. in Japan.

Comments

HarveyD

A few facts:

Ontario Canada is mainly supplied with 18+ heavily government supported CANDU NPPs but has (by far) the highest electricity in Canada.

Without the 100+ $B government handouts, electricity would already be above $0.30/kWh and everybody would insist that Ontario Hydro finds lower cost energy sources.

solarsurfer

Tesla needs to open its chargers to other EV's, hopefully Honda will be smart and use the new Panasonic cells that Tesla is building. OEM the charge controllers so the Rapid DC voltage is all the same.

Hydrogen may actually win if they can't get all the EVs on the same common infrastructure. Hydrogen will be so cheap to make from your roof in this decade, that PV charging batteries will never make sense. Lithium batteries innovation in density already asymptoped. To hit the target LCOE mobile batteries need to drop below $100/kw, be recharged in 15min and retain cycle life above 90% to compete.

Engineer-Poet
Ontario Canada is mainly supplied with 18+ heavily government supported CANDU NPPs but has (by far) the highest electricity in Canada.

You lie by omission, Harvey.  The current high rates in Ontario are due to the "Global Adjustment" scam which finances certain favored "renewables", specifically wind farms and PV panels.  It has nothing to do with Ontario's CANDUs.  It is wholly that "the government has promised outrageous prices to certain generators."

Without the 100+ $B government handouts, electricity would already be above $0.30/kWh and everybody would insist that Ontario Hydro finds lower cost energy sources.

Per world-nuclear.org,

According to a study by the Canadian Energy Research Institute, Canada’s nuclear reactors contribute C$6.6 billion per year to GDP, create C$1.5 billion in government revenue and generate some $1.2 billion in exports. The nuclear power industry employs 21,000 directly, 10,000 indirectly as contractors and is responsible for another 40,000 jobs indirectly.

About C$13.26 billion (in 2005 dollars) was invested by the government in Canada's nuclear program over 1952-2006 through AECL. This investment has generated more than C$160 billion in GDP benefits to Canada from power production, research and development, Candu exports, uranium, medical radioisotopes and professional services, according to AECL.

You've overstated said "handouts" (seed money) by a factor of 8, and ignored the massive paybacks on that investment.  You should be ashamed of yourself.

HarveyD

The C$13.6B (in 2005 $??) you mentioned would barely be enough to refurbish a single CANDU. Complete closing, including recycling or properly disposing all the used fuel would cost as much per CANDU.

Ontario is calling on the Federal government for new C$150B to C$250B handouts to refurbish and/or replace the 18+ CANDUs over the next 20+ years. Without the new handouts, Ontario may have to return to CPPs or build many more NGPPs or fix the NPPs and double the electricity (high) tariff.

Alternatively, Québec Hydro could supply (some) clean Hydro-Wind energy, at a rather low price for the next 15 years or so.

Another option would be to install 10,000+ high power wind turbines, on very high tower, around the Hudson Bay. Costly but no more than for NPPs.

USA will soon have the same problem with its 100+ NPPs.

HarveyD

All the 40,000 highly paid jobs + a few hundred/thousand contracts is part of the extreme high total cost of the electricity produced by NPPs.

Those CANADUs are no longer competitive and will have to be phased out.

Engineer-Poet

Cost estimate for refurbishing all 4 units of the Darlington station:  CDN$6-10 billion.

Refurbishment of 6 units at Bruce Point is estimated to cost CDN$13 billion.

These facts were out there waiting for you, Harvey... but you had your dogma and didn't want to know the truth.  Get your head out of where it's stuck.

Québec Hydro could supply (some) clean Hydro-Wind energy

Population of Quebec:  8.16 million.
Population of Ontario:  ~14 million estimated 1Q2017.

After this "some" is supplied... where's the rest supposed to come from?  You always evade that question, Harvey.  And what's supposed to supply the 320 million just south of your border?

Another option would be to install 10,000+ high power wind turbines, on very high tower, around the Hudson Bay.

"High power" these days is what, 5 MW?  Total 50 GW, about 1/9 average US demand?

So they'd all have mostly the same weather conditions at the same time.  Cranking in gales when nobody needs power, becalmed in winter highs when people are desperate.

I'd grab you by the lapels and shake you while demanding that you THINK DAMMIT!... but after all this time I'm solidly convinced that you can't.  Facts have minor to zero impact on your stated positions.

Those CANADUs are no longer competitive and will have to be phased out.

"Bruce Power is paid for all electricity from Bruce A on the basis of a 6.3 cents/kWh current reference price capped for 25 years..."

Meanwhile, the rate for rooftop PV is legislatively set as high as CDN0.294/kWh and that's a 25% reduction from what it was up to 2015.  That's well over 4X what Bruce Point gets for power that's available day or night, rain or shine, heat wave or winter cold.

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HarveyD

A plain fact that E-P has a hard time to assimilate is that:

1) cost of NPPs is going up year after year and is currently around $0.25/kWh and will soon reach $0.30/kWh and more..

2) cost of REs (with essential storage) is going down year after year and is know less than half the cost of nuclear.

So-Korea and France will close their NPPs.

HarveyD

Basically, it is all a matter of safety-security and cost per clean kWh energy produced/used.

Even NPP contractors from China have to charge about $0.22/kWh and more. Buyers have to accept the responsibility for spent fuel disposal etc.

Engineer-Poet
A plain fact that E-P has a hard time to assimilate

Harvey has a really hard time dealing with these things called "counterexamples".

1) cost of NPPs is going up year after year

Not at Barakah.  The S. Korean-built 4-unit plant being built in the UAE is on time and on budget.  Not in China either.  The difference is experienced general contractors and friendly rather than hostile regulators.  China will start the first-ever AP1000 this year.

2) cost of REs (with essential storage) is going down year after year

Except the storage to provide anything remotely close to fossil-level reliability of supply still costs multiples of the price of nuclear, and there's nobody willing or even able to pay that much for electric power to run the industries required to build "renewable" energy systems.  The so-called "renewables" cannot be built at a price people will pay without polluting fossil-fired energy.

So-Korea and France will close their NPPs.

Maybe they will, but they will soon have huge regrets as China and Russia eat their dinners.  Finland is fed up with the delays for the EPR at Olkiluoto and is contracting with Russia for its next NPP.  Russia is not leaving the field.  Neither is any country run by non-idiots.

Canada will regret allowing you to have the vote.

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