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Honda to unveil wireless V2G system at CES; leveraging WiTricity DRIVE 11 system

At CES 2019 in January, Honda will debut its Wireless Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) system, co-developed with WiTricity—a bi-directional energy management system that has the potential to reduce CO2 and create new value for customers.

Honda’s V2G solution leverages WiTricity’s DRIVE 11 wireless charging platform, which creates a seamless and efficient two-way energy flow between the car and grid. Vehicles can be parked over a wireless charging ground pad, and electric power can flow from the grid to the vehicle to charge the battery, or from the vehicle to the grid to help meet electric demand during peak usage periods.

Wptv2g

Block diagram for a bi-directional WPT system. Tachikawa et al.

The DRIVE 11 evaluation system is WiTricity’s end to end reference design for “Park-and-Charge” wireless charging of electric and hybrid vehicles. The Drive 11 ground assembly (GA) is capable of charging vehicles at industry standard 3.6 kW, 7.7, kW, or 11 kW levels, and is capable of on-ground and in-ground installation.

The Drive 11 vehicle assembly (VA) is available in low-, mid-, and high-ground clearance versions to handle the full range of passenger vehicles, SUVs, and light trucks.

Featuring WiTricity’s Tunable Matching Network (TMN), DRIVE 11 is able to maximize efficiency and power delivery over a very broad range of parking alignment, battery voltage, and power conditions. In addition, DRIVE 11 offers direct-to-battery charging to eliminate system losses associated with DC-DC converters and onboard chargers and can be configured to handle a wide range of battery voltage including the latest 800V packs used for high next generation high performance EVs.

Honda EV owners will be able to participate in the V2G program and receive compensation from utility operators who benefit from the use of Honda EVs to balance the grid’s energy supply.

To put this system in practical use, Honda is interested in collaborating with energy-related companies, including aggregators and electric companies.

Research and collaboration between Honda and WiTricity started in 2016; the companies presented a co-authored paper, “Feasibility Study of Bi-directional Wireless Charging for Vehicle-to-Grid,” at SAE World Congress in 2018.

Resources

  • Tachikawa, K., Kesler, M., and Atasoy, O. (2018), “Feasibility Study of Bi-directional Wireless Charging for Vehicle-to-Grid,” SAE Technical Paper 2018-01-0669 doi: 10.4271/2018-01-0669

Comments

Engineer-Poet

Nothing on cost or conversion losses.  I suspect the price of convenience is going to be pretty high, much too high to make e.g. power-through-the-road a viable proposition.  Plugging in with a robot arm might be cheaper; it would certainly be more efficient.

SJC

With enough PowerWall type packs in enough garages,
peak loads during summer days are not a problem.

Engineer-Poet

With enough beluga caviar, world hunger is not a problem.

SJC

Nonsense.

Engineer-Poet

Exactly.  For the same reason that your own post is nonsense.

HarveyD

REs, mainly Solar and Wind are gaining ground at the rate of 15% to 25%/year and will soon require more and more storage. Many of the large batteries installed in current and future electrified vehicles will certainly become a very interesting source of energy storage if not the larger source of storage.

Currently, many older (20 years old 0.5 MW wind mills) are being refurbished/replaced with higher efficiency 8 MW, 10MW and the new GE 12MW units. Those new larger more efficient (new and replacement) units can produce energy at a much lower cost (down to and under $0.02/kWh) and will require more storage sources/capacity.

Improved wide ban solar panels cost will come down from $0.33/Watt to under $0.18/W in the next 5 years and will require more storage units.

Extended range near future electrified vehicles with 100 to 200 KW batteries will certainly be considered and use as storage units to level up supply and demand. It will make economical sense to do it and would make better use of e-generation facilities.

Engineer-Poet
REs, mainly Solar and Wind are gaining ground at the rate of 15% to 25%/year and will soon require more and more storage.

Just because it's "required" doesn't mean it will exist, or even can exist.  Up to now, almost all the "storage" consisted of backing off the rate of fossil-fuel consumption in conventional power plants.  Now that peak generation is getting too high to be compatible with the must-run generators which provide essential grid services, there is a push to install a few hours of battery storage.  This will allow e.g. the noon-time PV peak to be time-shifted to the evening demand peak.

This has very hard limits.  Batteries which are affordable for a few hours of storage are prohibitive for the days and weeks that "renewables" (wind and solar) can go AWOL.

Many of the large batteries installed in current and future electrified vehicles will certainly become a very interesting source of energy storage if not the larger source of storage.

Two billion Tesla-class EVs can store barely 3 days of today's world-wide electric power consumption, probably more like 1 day's worth of a future, electric-dominant economy.  Harvey, you were schooled on this two weeks ago and reminded just two days ago.  If you cannot remember what happened 2 days ago, you need to go into Alzheimer's care.

HarveyD

All (100%) of current e-energy production does not have to be replaced with REs. You must/could start with the (40%) produced by the dirtiest CPPs.

Secondly, no where near 100% of REs will have to be stored with water, H2, heat and/or batteries. Well managed grids could use a high percentage of the e-energy produced by REs directly on indirectly by shifting loads. In cold areas, the use of electricity for heating uses up to 50% of the consumption. Most or all of that load can be shifted for many hours with heat retaining units. Future electrified vehicles (with much larger batteries) can and WILL be used to better manage supply and demand by shifting huge loads by many hours/days.

The current badly built and very badly insulated average residence uses or should use around 20 kWh/day. Changing current low SEER (under 10 to 12) AC for high SEER (above 30 or 32) heat pumps can reduce daily average consumption by 25% to 35% depending on the local weather and construction quality.

The average electrified vehicle will use around 10 to 15 kW/day. With large efficient near future batteries, refills could be delayed by many hours/days to make better use of e-energy from REs. Electrified vehicles, not being actively used, could/will supply energy on demand to even up and better match supply and demand.

We will learn how to better manage e-energy supply and demand in order to make much better use of REs in the near future, while reducing the use of electricity from polluting sources such as CPPs and NGPPs. Affordable 24/7 REs with storage are coming regardless of E-P's opinions.

I like E-P's politeness. He will soon compete with DT and they will probably never admit that they were wrong.

Engineer-Poet
You must/could start with the (40%) produced by the dirtiest CPPs.

That is not possible.  The coal power plants, along with large-reservoir hydro, have one of the few energy stockpiles required to fill in for unavailability of unreliable sources like solar and wind.  Without those energy stockpiles you have to go to blackouts for "demand-side management", and that is unacceptable.  This is why the "Energiewende" has completely failed to continue reductions in carbon emissions in Germany.

Secondly, no where near 100% of REs will have to be stored with water, H2, heat and/or batteries. Well managed grids could use a high percentage of the e-energy produced by REs directly on indirectly by shifting loads.

It is not possible to shift most loads.  Light, water and sewage treatment, sewage and stormwater lifting, most refrigeration and many industrial loads are impossible or prohibitively expensive to time-shift.  There are extreme limits on many of the rest, particularly heat.  The lower the density of the heat storage, the more costly it is to provide time-shifting.

In cold areas, the use of electricity for heating uses up to 50% of the consumption.

You cannot time-shift heating loads by much, especially when your heat is produced at low temperature and requires very large masses of storage material.  Overheating spaces in times of surplus does not make up for underheating at other times.  If you do this, people's health will suffer and some will die.

Most or all of that load can be shifted for many hours with heat retaining units.

Cycles of RE deficit/surplus extend from weeks to seasons.  Hours of shifting is useless for such unreliability, and that does not include the opposite phase of solar energy to heating load.

Future electrified vehicles (with much larger batteries) can and WILL be used to better manage supply and demand by shifting huge loads by many hours/days.

Harvey you nitwit, I have explained to you time and time again not just why they WILL NOT do that, but why they CANNOT do that.  Even if you had batteries with sufficient energy density, you would not carry more on the vehicle than it needs to do its job because carrying extra weight means more energy cost and more wear and tear on everything.

Despite this, you keep repeating your nonsense.  You are past the point at which this can be considered any kind of principled disagreement and are well into the troll zone.  "Big lie" techniques are the province of propaganda, not intellectual inquiry.

Affordable 24/7 REs with storage are coming regardless of E-P's opinions.

The materials alone for Li-ion batteries make them prohibitively expensive (in not just money, but energy) for "24/7" availability.  You can't make a battery cheaper than its raw materials.  You have been told this, but continue to claim the opposite.  Senility or barefaced lying?  Pick one.

I like E-P's politeness.

Politeness in the face of chronic trolling is a mistake.  It must be called out for what it is.

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