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DOE: more than 6,500 fuel cell vehicles are on the road in the US

The number of fuel cell vehicles available to consumers and on the road continues to grow as exhibited by sales and lease volumes. As of February 2019, there were 6,558 fuel cell vehicles on the road, according to the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Fuel cell vehicle sales (including leases) are currently only offered in select areas that have hydrogen refueling infrastructure.

Cumulative fuel cell vehicle sales, January 2015 – February 2019.

FOM graphic March 2019_1

Source: DOE.

Comments

Engineer-Poet

Meanwhile, more than 350,000 PEVs were sold in the USA in 2018 alone, over 1 million total since 2012.

The only thing keeping hypedrogen going is continuing government subsidies.

HarveyD

The high growth rate of FCEVs and H2 economy is amazing specially from only two units from Toyota and Honda. As more and more H2 stations and FCEVs (large and small) and fixed energy production units are produced, by more manufacturers, it will contribute to pollution and GHG reduction + greater use of REs..

Engineer-Poet

"The high growth rate of FCEVs and H2 economy is amazing"

POP!

"The high growth rate of FCEVs and H2 economy is amazing"

POP!

"The high growth rate of FCEVs and H2 economy is amazing"

POP!

I am so tired of AlzHarvey's broken record.

electric-car-insider.com

I wonder how many of the Mirai were purchases vs leases.

At some point, that will be some exotic hardware to recover.

yoatmon

I had no idea that there were 6,500 fools on the road propagating more than 6,500 fool cells.

Gasbag

If I’m reading the graph correctly in CY2016 they were leasing less than 3 FCEVs per day and starting in about 2017 that jumped to a little less than 6 vehicles per day. That rate has remained fairly constant.

Hyundai has contributed very little to the US total inspite of their bold claims. Meanwhile Honda flatlined a few months ago.

Virtually all of these will be in California and are on a three year lease in order to get the CA incentives. It will be interesting to see what happens to the graph in 9 months when 6 vehicles per day start coming off lease. They are in. A tough position in that they can’t lease cars if they don’t include fuel and the retail cost of H2 will resist price declines as long as they are paying for fuel. When these come off lease they may have to ship them to a market with lower retail fuel costs or scrap them.

Engineer-Poet

It takes a special sort of crazy to believe that holding 0.6% as much of the market as the next-biggest ZEV fleet, and being dependent upon an exorbitantly expensive fueling infrastructure which itself only exists because of very high government subsidies, is any kind of success.  It's on life support in the ICU; flip that switch off and it's dead.

I doubt there IS any market with lower fuel costs, Gasbag.  Maybe there is some potential for ripping out the hydrogen tanks (might be some resale value there) and FC hardware and throwing in batteries, but it would be a lot of custom labor that still yields an inferior vehicle.  Maybe some hobbyists will get some to convert and play with, but I'll bet that the ones coming off lease will go the way of GM's EV1s and wind up crushed to eliminate any possibility of warranty costs or lawsuits.

SJC

If long haul trucks start using fuel cells, the numbers could increase.

Gasbag

“I doubt there IS any market with lower fuel costs”

In Europe I Believe they pay $6-7 USD per gallon for gas so H2 @ 14 per Kg would not be a problem. There might be other perks like being able to use these in cities any day of the week and/or avoiding congestion fees.

Does anyone know what H2 retails for in Europe, Japan, or South Korea?

Are there issues with homologation? Are there H2 refueling system compatibility issues between CA and other regions?

Engineer-Poet
In Europe I Believe they pay $6-7 USD per gallon for gas so H2 @ 14 per Kg would not be a problem.

On par with highly-taxed petroleum is one thing.  Cheaper than California is another thing entirely.  And what about all the OTHER things that hydrogen is supposed to substitute for, such as natural gas for heating and cooking?  Is $14/kg going to fly for that?  I don't think so.

The Greens have been promising affordable emissions-free energy for decades now.  So far they've neither gotten rid of the emissions (Germany is still backing up with coal!) nor have they made energy affordable; quite the opposite.  It's time for the romantics to admit they were wrong and let the engineers get on with fixing things.

electric-car-insider.com

I’d love to see long haul trucks as ZEV, but with H2 at $14/kg, and refueling infrastructure at 10x the capex vs BEV, FC Semis seem unlikely to succeed.

Because BEV Semis can fundamentally change the economics of transportation with $1gal equivalent, it’s just a matter of battery energy density reaching a practical value. Who is going to spend a few hundred billion on a nationwide H2 infrastructure if 400W/kg is going to be commercially available by 2022-2025?


SJC

$14 per kilogram for hydrogen made from $1 of natural gas?

SJC

$14 per kilogram for hydrogen made from $1 of natural gas?

Engineer-Poet
Who is going to spend a few hundred billion on a nationwide H2 infrastructure if 400W/kg is going to be commercially available by 2022-2025?

I'd like to say "nobody", but given how stupid Congress gets when chasing oil-company campaign funds (and there really is only one group that stands to benefit from hypedrogen) I wouldn't be surprised if we do anyway.

electric-car-insider.com

SJC, you’re right, H2 is entirely non-economic that way.

That’s probably why NG trucks and refueling systems exhibits outnumber H2 by 10:1 or better at shows like ACT Expo.

Take a look at the map for NG refueling infrastructure in North America:

https://afdc.energy.gov/fuels/natural_gas_locations.html#/find/nearest?fuel=CNG

Then compare to Hydrogen:

https://afdc.energy.gov/fuels/hydrogen_locations.html#/find/nearest?fuel=HY

It’s a stunning rebuke of H2’s fitness for market.


HarveyD

Based on current and past development rate (5% to 8%/year) it will take another 15+ years before an affordable 400 Wh/Kg and 500 Wh/Kg batteries are mass produced and on the market place.

A few very high cost units may be produced for space agencies put would be prohibitive for large commercial e-trucks.

yoatmon

I'm so sorry to disappoint you Harvey but EMBATT will be entering the mass market in 2020 with a battery better than that.

Calgarygary

This report for the IEA sets the cost of producing hydrogen (uncompressed) via SMR at $1-3/kg depending on the price of gas. It also shows the cost of producing hydrogen from renewables such as solar or wind can be in the vicinity of $2-3 if the utilization rate of the electrolysers is around 30% or better and the cost of the electricity is around $30/mwh.

Note that even though gasoline is a very expensive form of energy (comparable to C$0.35-0.40) per useful kwh, it still remains very popular.

This report

SJC

I would say they are paying off the cost of capital equipment at $14, it is not feed stock prices. Natural gas is 25 cents per therm wholesale.

Engineer-Poet

That really depends where you are; natural gas delivered to Japan costs about $1.20/therm.  Russia, North America and the Middle East are outliers.

electric-car-insider.com

Harvey, the math *within your own post* does not add up.

Tesla is at 250W/kg now (actually met that milestone several years ago).

8% improvement per year takes only 7 years to get to 428W/kg.

That would line up with VWs widely quoted prediction that we’ll see a major step change by 2022. (They are putting their money where their mouth is on this one, with multi billion dollar investments through the value chain from R&D to massive scale production, as you have read here on GCC many times in the past year).

HarveyD

Promises-break throughs for affordable quick charge 500 Wh/Kg (5-5-5) batteries have been around for 10+ years but only about half and less than half that level is in actual use.

Will all those promises batteries be around by 2025 or 2030? I hope so. We will see?

electric-car-insider.com

Perhaps you didn’t notice that the Nissan Leaf, for example, has steadily progressed from 73 mile range in 2010 to 226 mile range in 2019.

A 300% increase in 10 years Harvey. That’s actually 12% per year. Affordable commercial product for end-users, not laboratory test cells. Fast charge capable.

I don’t know why I bother to post replies to ridiculous assertions like “it will take another 15 years...”

Astute readers of this site know better.

SJC

The article is referring to the U.S. not Japan.

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