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Plug Power launches 30 kW ProGen fuel cell system

Plug Power Inc. launched its 30 kW hydrogen fuel cell system, the newest commercial product from the ProGen suite of products. The ProGen 30kW engine provides a cost-effective solution to meet the needs of today’s electric vehicle (EV) use-case, including high utilization, extended runtimes, reliable performance in harsh environments, rapid fueling, and zero emissions.

Delivery vans and light/medium duty cargo box trucks are some of the leading applications for the 30KW ProGen hydrogen engine.

Delivery of the first commercial orders for this product are scheduled in July 2019 to European and Asian on-road e-mobility applications. The modular pre-engineered ProGen engines allow OEMs to rapidly convert commercial fleet vehicles to zero emission powertrains, reduce time to market, and benefit from the ProGen volume leverage in the overall market.

The complete 30kW ProGen engine solution contains the fuel cell stack, required balance of plant, dc/dc converter, and cooling.

According to KPMG’s 2018 Global Automotive Executive Survey, hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles have replaced battery electric vehicles as the no. 1 key trend in the automotive industry until 2025.

A McKinsey report further backs this, predicting that by 2050, hydrogen could power a global fleet of more than 400 million cars, 15 to 20 million trucks, and around 5 million buses, which constitute on average 20 to 25% of their respective transportation segments.

As enterprises around the world invest in a combination of hydrogen and battery powered electric vehicles, they’ve seen increased range and vehicle uptime while simultaneously enjoying decreased fuel and maintenance costs.

Plug Power looks forward to leading this e-mobility revolution with continued additions to the growing line of ProGen products.

Comments

Davemart

Slowly but surely hydrogen and fuel cells are gaining momentum.

Detractors were claiming that hydrogen networks would never be built, that they were a delaying tactic against BEVs and could never work and the companies had no intention of really building them, and we are now on course for 100 stations in Germany by the end of the year.

For heavier and longer distance vehicles fuel cells provide a better performance envelope than batteries alone.

Many people can not realistically plug in at home, and there is also no realistic way of enabling them to do so, whilst as the true costs shake down it is becoming increasingly apparent that the cost to charge a BEV away from home ex tax and subsidies is as much or more than petrol.

And in cities fuel cell buses, taxis and trucks can actively clean the air, which BEVs do not do.

Not that I am against BEVs, but I do think we need better batteries, and the notion that BEVs were the only way to go and the answer to everything was never more than a bloggosphere fantasy in my view.

Use different technologies where they are most appropriate, is my take, don't try to hammer everything into a one size fits all.

Engineer-Poet
Slowly but surely hydrogen and fuel cells are gaining momentum.

6500-odd vehicles in the USA doesn't sound like momentum to me.

Detractors were claiming that hydrogen networks would never be built, that they were a delaying tactic against BEVs

Didn't work very well, did it?  Kind of like the "decarbonization" of the Energiewende, which has stalled out.

we are now on course for 100 stations in Germany by the end of the year.

A fuel distribution network which costs over $1 million per installation, whose only purpose is to cover for the unreliability of the "renewable" electric generation it is tasked to provide storage for at a very steep price.  Meanwhile, electric market changes claimed to promote "renewables" have forced the closure of German pumped-hydro storage facilities and reduced the amount of storage on the grid.

For heavier and longer distance vehicles fuel cells provide a better performance envelope than batteries alone.

Doing what electrified rail was doing in the 19th century is not much of an accomplishment.  Besides, how does H2 stack up against, say, a diesel genset burning dimethyl ether?

Many people can not realistically plug in at home, and there is also no realistic way of enabling them to do so

Oh, please.  Most parking is AT MOST 20 meters from a source of electric power.  Wiring every slot in every parking garage, every carport and every parking meter in every city would be almost trivial; many Canadian cities wired their parking long ago so that people could plug in their engine block heaters.  You're saying 21st century Germany cannot do what mid-20th century Canada did?

in cities fuel cell buses, taxis and trucks can actively clean the air, which BEVs do not do.

Why should vehicles have to do double duty as air cleaners?  Put boxes with HEPA filters on the streets if that's what you need; it avoids the weight and energy cost of carrying the filter along while driving.  And again, how does H2 stack up against the DME/diesel genset?  That would be pretty darn clean too, and pull particulates out of the air on its own intake filter.

the notion that BEVs were the only way to go and the answer to everything was never more than a bloggosphere fantasy in my view.

The notion that hypedrogen is THE future remains the Green fantasy.

sd

Fuel Cells-- a solution looking for a problem since 1838.

SJC

Every comment gets criticized but no solutions forthcoming.

Engineer-Poet

DME-burning diesel sustainer engines are a solution, but SJC isn't smart enough to recognize that even when it's right in front of his face.

At least he's not paid by the word like AlzHarvey.

HarveyD

SAEP can't stop biting posters?

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