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ExxonMobil expands low-emissions technology research with universities in India

ExxonMobil signed agreements with the Indian Institute of Technology locations in Madras and Bombay, further expanding its portfolio of research collaboration with India’s universities.

The five-year agreements focus on progressing research in biofuels and bio-products, gas transport and conversion, climate and environment, and low-emissions technologies for the power and industrial sectors. The agreements will partner the institutes’ areas of expertise with ExxonMobil’s research.

These collaborations are recent additions to a series of partnerships ExxonMobil has established to progress innovative, lower-emissions research programs with more than 80 universities, five energy centers and multiple private sector partners. The company has spent $10 billion since 2000 developing and deploying lower-emissions energy solutions.

Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras is a public engineering institute located in Chennai, Tamil Nadu and has been ranked as India’s top engineering institute for the fourth consecutive year by India’s Ministry of Human Resource Development. IIT Bombay is a public engineering institute located in Powai, Mumbai and is widely recognized as a leader in engineering, education and research. The IIT system has 23 institutes, each of which is autonomous and linked through a common council, which oversees their administration.

Recently, ExxonMobil conducted a joint study with IIT Bombay and the Council for Energy, Environment and Water, a leading India-based think-tank, focusing on the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with India’s power sector. The study looked at India’s projected electricity demand growth over the next 20 to 30 years and compared emissions associated with power generated by domestic coal and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imported from the United States. It found that, on average, life cycle GHG emissions from LNG imported into India are approximately 54% lower than those associated with India coal.

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