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Strong hybrid sales lift Toyota Motor Europe to 5.3% market share; 52% mix of hybrids sustained into Q3

Toyota Motor Europe reported strong performance continuing into the third quarter 2019 driven by new model introductions and increased demand for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). The company announced Jan-Sep total vehicle sales of 838,691 units across the region in a declining market, reporting 3.1% growth year-on-year, showing an increase of 2.6% for Toyota and 9.4% for Lexus.

Of that, total hybrid sales were 435,881 units, representing +16% growth year-on-year.

Despite the weaker European market, Toyota & Lexus sales have increased thanks to strong demand for our hybrid models. We were confident of continued sales and market share growth this year but demand is even higher than our original expectations. This strong performance will continue in quarter four and we are on track to comfortably exceed our total Toyota and Lexus sales objective of 1,065,000 this year due to the strength of our hybrid order bank.

—Matt Harrison, TME Executive Vice President

Demand has surged for models with hybrid electric powertrains now representing 52% of the sales mix across Greater Europe, and 62% in Western Europe only.

Customers have responded very positively to the new Corolla Hatchback and Touring Sports, which are now available with two hybrid electric powertrains: 1.8L – 122 hp and 2.0L - 180hp. This “dual hybrid” strategy has boosted Corolla’s combined hybrid mix to 84%. In addition, the Corolla Sedan is, for the first time, available with a hybrid electric powertrain that represents about 50% of the new model sales.

Demand is also strong for the new RAV4 and for the new premium crossover Lexus UX, with hybrid electric mix of 80% and 90% respectively in Western Europe.

The new Camry has been successfully expanded this year to Western Europe where it is sold exclusively with a hybrid electric powertrain.

Lexus sales increased by 9.4% versus last year, due to the introduction of the Lexus ES and the new Lexus UX.

Top Toyota-brand hybrids were: Toyota C-HR Hybrid (94,536); Corolla hatchback & Touring Sports (89,835); Yaris Hybrid (86,330); RAV4 (75,168). Total Toyota-brand hybrid sales were 392,804 (+15% year-on-year).

Top Lexus hybrids were: NX Hybrid (13,181); UX Hybrid (13,198); RX Hybrid (5,215). Total Lexus-brand hybrid sales were 43,077 (+28% year-on-year).

Comments

HarveyD

Toyota is now larger than the combined ex-Big 3. The excellent ICEVs/HEVs/PHEVs and FCEVs are probably the main reason. BEVs are still missing?

Engineer-Poet

If Toyota can manage over 50% hybrids, why can't everyone do 100% hybrids?

TM

I would love to know what their average MPG is for Europe.

TM

Here is an article with a graphic on MPG.
They don't compare so well to other car manufacturers because toyota sells a lot of trucks while others don't. Wish they had the specs comparing only cars.
https://aceee.org/blog/2019/03/toyota-loses-ground-fuel-economy

Roger Pham

The Prius badly needs the 2.0 liter 180 hp power train to avoid sagging sales in the USA.

SJC

The head of Toyota said a while back all model lines would have a hybrid.
That has not happened yet, but maybe they are getting there.

gryf

Toyota has a new platform called e-TNGA for electric vehicles. You can read about it here. Project chief engineer Koji Toyoshima told Automotive News that "The parts of the car are all produced as modules." Batteries will range from 50 kilowatt-hours to 100 kWh, Toyoshima said. They will be mated to two types of motors, small or medium. Motor output will range from 80 to 150 kilowatts.

HarveyD

The world, specially North Americans, are not yet ready for more HEVs/PHEVs/BEVs/FCEVs.

To accelerate the switch, more restrictions will have to be applied on polluting ground, air and sea vehicles. Progressive higher carbon taxes + more restricted areas for ICEVs could help?

Engineer-Poet

Just put a limit of e.g. 1 gallon of E10-equivalent fuel consumption for the first 30 miles on the WLTP, starting with a fully-charged traction battery (if any).  Then 3 years later raise that to 35 miles, 40 miles after 6 years, 45 miles after 9 years and 50 miles after 12 years.  Everything will go hybrid or plug-in.

Zero-emission zones will help but they will not affect users who don't enter those zones.  Those vehicles will account for a disproportionate fraction of distance driven.  Starting the first X miles per day or per trip with electric propulsion will have an even more disproportionate effect on total fuel consumption.

Engineer-Poet

Just put a limit of e.g. 1 gallon of E10-equivalent fuel consumption for the first 30 miles on the WLTP, starting with a fully-charged traction battery (if any).  Then 3 years later raise that to 35 miles, 40 miles after 6 years, 45 miles after 9 years and 50 miles after 12 years.  Everything will go hybrid or plug-in.

Zero-emission zones will help but they will not affect users who don't enter those zones.  Those vehicles will account for a disproportionate fraction of distance driven.  Starting the first X miles per day or per trip with electric propulsion will have an even more disproportionate effect on total fuel consumption.

SJC

Punishments don't always work but incentives might. No sales tax for HEV/PHEV/EV purchases. A solid tax credit on all three for at least five years.

HarveyD

A good mix of progressive sticks and carrots restrictions/laws could certainly work to reduce both bio & fossil fuels usage, pollution and GHGs? These programs could be budget neutral?

The same approach would be needed for electricity production and sale. Energy from NPPs and REs could have a progressive subsidy while energy from CPPs and NGPPs could be taxed progressively based on pollution and GHGs created. The program could be budget neutral?

Alternatively, a new progressive bio-fossil fuel tax could be easier to apply/collect.
Clean H2 could be negatively taxed, i.e. receive a progressive subsidy?

To maintain fair trade, imported goods manufactured with unclean energy should be taxed at a decent relevant rate?

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