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DOE awards $187M to support innovative advanced manufacturing R&D, including $65.9M for batteries

The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced approximately $187 million in funding, including $48 million of cost-share, for 55 projects in 25 states to support innovative advanced manufacturing research and development. These projects address high-impact manufacturing technology, materials, and process challenges.

The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Advanced Manufacturing Office will provide funding for projects in the following three topic areas:

  1. Innovations for the Manufacture of Advanced Materials: $124.6 million for 36 projects focused on new, low-cost manufacturing processes to catalyze domestic battery manufacturing, phase-change storage materials for heating and cooling applications, and the development of innovative materials for harsh service conditions.

  2. Lower Thermal Budget Processes for Industrial Efficiency & Productivity: $28.7 million for 8 projects to conduct novel research on industrial process heating and drying technologies to increase energy efficiency and product quality. These projects are related to process heating which accounts for 70% of all manufacturing process energy use.

  3. Lower Thermal Budget Processes for Industrial Efficiency & Productivity: $28.7 million for 8 projects to conduct novel research on industrial process heating and drying technologies to increase energy efficiency and product quality. These projects are related to process heating which accounts for 70% of all manufacturing process energy use.

$65.9 million for batteries. As part of the first topic, the selections include $65.9 million for 10 projects in Subtopic 1.2 (Innovative Manufacturing Processes for Battery Energy Storage) toward lowering the cost of battery energy storage through manufacturing innovation, as part of DOE’s Energy Storage Grand Challenge, recently announced by Us Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette.

Of the $65.9 million, $24.2 million will go to Applied Materials for the project “Advanced Anode Manufacturing through Ultra-Thin Li Deposition”.

Another $12 million goes to Western Michigan University for the project “Enabling Advanced Electrode Architecture through Printing Technique”.

The Grand Challenge will accelerate the development, commercialization, and utilization of next-generation energy storage technologies and sustain American global leadership in energy storage. The battery manufacturing selections were co-funded by EERE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office and with support from the Vehicle Technologies Office.

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